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My free February desktop calendar features an image from Antarctica’s Plenneau Bay the “iceberg graveyard”.

Download your free copy here.

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“Ends of the Earth is a dramatic, photographic voyage of the world’s ice caps and glaciers that depicts the magnificent beauty of the frozen landscape in large format color images.

Martyn Lucas grew up in England and was first introduced to photography by his father, a photographer who taught him composition, contrast, and how to perfectly capture a landscape.  Lucas’ natural talent for landscape photography has led him all over the world, seeing and preserving each new place through the lens of a camera.

Inspired by the Polar Regions, Lucas has quite literally travelled to the Ends of the Earth to photograph the world’s ice caps and glaciers.  These photographs, each breathtakingly beautiful, leave the viewer stunned as they are given the rare opportunity to see the vastness of Antarctica: the coldest, driest, and windiest place on Earth.  Carefully photographing the urgency of global warming and the ice melting at alarming rates, Lucas has been able to present the unseen dilemmas of the world’s climate system.

Like viewing something out of a dream, this haunting exhibition promises to deliver the extreme beauty and silence of the frozen tundra, as seen through Martyn Lucas’ artistic vision.  Each work complements the others when viewed as a whole, and yet each is a distinct work of art on its own.

The artwork of this incredible photographer is nothing short of captivating, revealing the massive size of the ice and the strong current and movement of the icy water.  Viewers are welcome to come celebrate this incredible exhibition January 10, 2015 for the opening of Ends of the Earth, located in the Bunzl Gallery.  Visitors of The Bascom also invited to Martyn Lucas’ Artist Talk and Reception Saturday, March 21, 2015 from 5 to 7 pm at The Bascom.  Experience the wonder of Martyn Lucas’ Polar Regions photography through this breathtaking assemblage of photographs. ”

For more information, please contact The Bascom at 828.526.4949 or visit www.thebascom.org.

Find out more about this exhibit here.

Find out more about Martyn Lucas here.

Read more Alumni Success Stories here.

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Enchanting Antarctica is explored in this beautiful ebook.

Individual portfolios are followed by a selection of images shot at the same locations at the same times by both artists.

Essays include personal responses to place and insights into the many influences that arise by working side-by-side.

It’s inspiring!

46 images

60 pages

It’s free for a limited time only.

It’s our gift to you.

Happy Holidays!

Download it here!

2Visions1

201408_Insights

My enews Insights broadcasts today at 3:15 pm EST.

In this issue …

I’m announcing our next Fly Antarctica / Sail Across The Circle Workshop. Participants were thrilled this winter and we can’t wait to go back! Space is limited so reserve yours now! There’s 1 space left in our Greenland Ice Fiords & Auroras Workshop.

Seth Resnick and I have released a new ebook Antarctica / Two Visions. In addition to inspiring you with images of Antarctica, it will give you many insights into how much we’ve influenced each other by working so closely together and yet still remain so different. It’s free for a limited time only!

Three Raw Processing Resources and 21 Recommended Books On Digital Processing will help you make the most of your files.

Find out about photographer Wynn Bullock - a new exhibit, new book, and classic quotes.

Sign up for my enews Collectors Alert and get a one time only 50% print discount.

There’s more … exhibits, lectures, articles, calendars, green actions, etc.

Enjoy!

Sign up for Insights enews free here. 

2Visions_Cover_425

Enchanting Antarctica is explored in this beautiful ebook.

Individual portfolios are followed by a selection of images shot at the same locations at the same times by both artists.

Essays include personal responses to place and insights into the many influences that arise by working side-by-side.

It’s inspiring!

46 images

60 pages

It’s free for a limited time only!

Download it here!

Find out about our next Antarctica workshop here.

2Visions1 2Visions2

This month’s desktop calendar features an image from Antarctica.

Download it here now.



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Click here to enlarge.

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Click here to enlarge.

It took me some time to get a clearer sense for the images I made during my sixth voyage to Antarctica with Seth Resnick during our Digital Photo Destinations workshop. Lacking the big moments that immediately stood out on previous voyages (Curiously only a few of these selects were taken during our most dramatic moment when we spent four continuous hours in Pleneau Bay or The Iceberg Graveyard, where we found not one but three ice arches.), this voyage was a quiet sustained build of repeatedly chasing several ideas (minimal spaces, sheltering skies, glacial abstractions, ice details). The quieter more sensitive nature of this work became clearer as I reflected upon the way the files were processed, with a softer touch. Even as I left Antarctica, I wasn’t sure of exactly what I had, but the more time I spend with the work the more I begin to understand it. Antarctica’s many moods and its elusive mysteries are what keep me longing to return.

View more Contact Sheets here.

View Seth Resnick’s images from the same voyage here.

Learn more about my digital printing and digital photography workshops.

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Antarctica III, The Southern Ocean, Antarctica, 2005 

I’d been scanning the iceberg struck horizon for hours when suddenly the clouds grew thin enough to let the sun through for a brief moment. The sun and the light it cast on the surface of the water completed the picture. It was there only for a moment. And then it was gone.

There are so many moments like this in life. In these times, there’s a narrow window of opportunity and only those who stay alert recognize them and are able to take full advantage of them. Of course it helps to have the right tools for the job and solid training, good instincts, and fast reflexes. But none of these will do you any good if you aren’t aware enough to recognize the many opportunities before you.

Photography (and its extension in motion pictures), relies on the power of the moment more than any other medium. Sure music, dance, and theater also require precise timing, but the moments they present can be created and recreated. You can practice until you get the moment right. But with the historical photographic moment, you get one chance and then it’s gone.

To be sure, not all moments are equally fleeting. Some moments last longer than others. And certain events do reoccur more than once and even recur repeatedly. Sometimes you do get more than one chance. Sometimes you don’t. It helps to know how long a window of opportunity you have and if you’ll get another chance. When you do have more than one chance, depending on how much time you have between each recurring event, you may find it time well spent to observe carefully on your first opportunity before acting on your next opportunity. This is perhaps the best preparation of all. When you won’t have another opportunity, you need to think fast and when you don’t have time for that you need to trust your instincts. No matter how many opportunities you have, to succeed you need to stay alert.

Maintenance is key. It’s harder to stay alert if you don’t take care of yourself. Sleep, diet, and exercise all contribute to your being. (And never underestimate the power of motivation.) Start with the basics, but don’t stop there.

Just as you can practice to hone your reflexes, there are things you can do to develop your awareness, such as studies and meditations – and there are many ways to do both (too many to mention here). You can learn to bring yourself into heightened states awareness more consistently, quickly and intensely. This too requires practice. It’s time well spent. Like anything, the more you do it, the better you get at it – especially if you stay alert while you do it.

Questions

What can you do to increase your sensitivity?

What can you do to increase your understanding?

What can you do to increase your emotional responses?

What can you do to increase your ability to sustain your awareness for longer periods of time?

Find out more about this image here. 

View more related images here.

Read more The Stories Behind The Images here.

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My free August desktop calendar features an image from Antarctica.

Download it here now.

Find out about upcoming events here.

Take A Break

June 26, 2013 | Leave a Comment |

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Antarctica V, 2005

In 2005 I made the voyage from Ushuaia Argentina to the Antarctic Peninsula to colead a photography workshop with five other instructors – Michael Reichmann, Stephen Johnson, Jeff Schewe, and Seth Resnick, along with 45 participants. It was tremendously stimulating to be in the company of such diversity and observe our varied creative processes. The journey was the fulfillment of a long standing wish to visit Antarctica, made as a young man while watching my mother shepherd the production of photographer Eliot Porter’s book on the region. With so many influences, I knew the key to personal success lay in finding my own voice amid so many.

Antarctica is so exotic it seduces you instantly. Because everything was interesting and different to us, many participants joked that, “You couldn’t make a bad picture.” But I knew a key question that success hinged upon answering was, “How different were our pictures from one another’s and from those that had been made before ours?”

It was natural that we wanted to maximize our time shooting with only seven days on the peninsula, three were lost in transit during our crossing of the Drake Passage, the roughest seas in the world, and our first trip could be our last, as it was a rare opportunity. When we weren’t sleeping, we were always on the lookout for more photographs. And we slept only a little, because the days were long, as the nights were little more than a period of twilight after an hours long sunset and before an hours long sunrise.

At one point in my journey, I realized I had reached a saturation point and needed to look inward to process the overwhelming stimulus, reorient, and reconnect. It wasn’t rest I needed most. It was reflection. During one of only fourteen opportunities, instead of going to shore to photograph, I made a few exposures from the ship decks – one of which worked (this one) – and I went down below and wrote in peace and quiet.

You can read what I wrote here.

It was time well spent. During that time I was able to ask the important questions, connect the many new pieces I had found to this puzzle, clarify my understanding, returning with renewed energy and purpose. Later, when my friend Seth Resnick looked at my finished images he said two things that were music to my ears. First he said, “Where did you find that one?” He had been standing next to me when I made the exposure; we had seen entirely different things – and that is the way it should be. Then second he said, “Your images are so you!” That was my goal. I wouldn’t have reached it without a lot of passionate, smart, hard work and more than a little reflection. And for both, I needed to take a break.

Taking a break isn’t easy in an era and culture that prizes productivity so highly. But there are times when you need to take a break. But … Why? When? How often? And, what do you do on a break? While there’s no one answer for every individual and situation, you’ll find lots of advice on the subject, some good and some bad. Take the good, leave the bad.

Do be mindful. There’s more than one kind of break to take. We need to take breaks to recharge our batteries; to energize we need rest, relaxation, and entertainment; these are usually but not exclusively longer breaks that don’t involve productivity in another area; the goal is renewed energy. We need to take breaks to find a fresh perspective; walk away from the problem or sleep on it; these are usually shorter breaks that often involve productivity in another area or switching gears sometimes making unexpected connections; the goal is insight. There are many other reasons and ways to take breaks.

The time to take a break is after you’ve thoroughly researched a challenge and put your understanding through systematic tests to confirm it and clearly identify the most promising avenues for further inquiry. Then, you need to walk away from the problem, clearing your mind entirely of it, so you can return to it with a fresh perspective. Generally, in the time in between, your subconscious has put the pieces … it may even find that ever elusive missing piece.

Curiously, many great breakthroughs in history have come when people sleep on it. Valuable insights have been found during sleep for individuals as diverse as Alexander Graham Bell, C J Jung, Mary Shelley, and Jack Nicklaus leading to discoveries such as James Watson’s uncovering of the double helix structure of DNA; Friedrich Kekule’s visions of the structures of the carbon atom and benzene molecule; Dimitry Mendeleyev’s creation of chemistry’s Periodic Table; Elias Howe’s invention of the sewing machine needle; and many others.

Questions

What are the benefits of taking breaks personally?

What are the benefits of taking breaks professionally?

What break frequency is optimal for you?

What break duration is optimal for you?

What activities during breaks are most regenerating for you?

What activities during breaks are most stimulating for you?

What activities during breaks are most enjoyable for you?

Are you good at distinguishing between taking a break and switching activities?

What do you need to do to really take a break?

What can you do to clarify your goals for your break?

Find out more about this image here.

View more related images here.

Read more The Stories Behind The Images here.


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