I’m having a great time printing this series of images!

At first glance, they look like classic black and white images. In reality, they’re full color captures of a near neutral subject, processed and printed as color images. The trace amounts of color from the original subject make a very subtle but meaningful addition to the final image and print.

The trace amounts of color in the image are so subtle, I wasn’t sure which color management options would yield the best printed results; shadow detail, gradation, neutrality and graybalance all play major roles.

To get the final prints today, I tested multiple printer color management routes (Photoshop, Printer, Printer Adv B&W)(my ImagePrint tests are pending). Using Printer color management  for color offered the results I was looking for – not Photoshop, which clipped deep shadow detail and not Printer Adv B&W which rendered warm grays by default and cool toning solutions added more cool toning to the highlights than the shadows making the prints look like they carried a faint color cross).

They’re really touchy images. I found out how touchy when I went from 4×6 proofs to 11×14 prints, which when enlarged looked slightly lighter and lower contrast. A contrast curve for enlargement solved this.

At larger scale the noise became an issue, which I’m sleeping on. On the one hand, the subject is made of particles of water, which you can see when you are there. On the other hand it looks distracting to people who don’t know this. Water blurs with motion but the motion is frozen in these very fast exposures. I polled other people around me (including my father). Then I settled on an unexpected solution. I let some of the noise come through only in the areas of greatest focus, drawing slightly more attention to them. (Some noise can makes images appear sharper.)

There was a another surprise. I tested the images on glossy paper (Epson Exhibition Fine Art Paper). The extra depth in the blacks made another improvement in the image, so much so that it was worth the trade off for the soft surface of the matte paper. I made a similar test with a related series, Fumo, and didn’t make this choice. But here it was clear. This is the first time I’ve made my final prints on glossy paper.

I made these images while scouting my 2011 Focus On Nature workshop with Ragnar Th Sigurdsson and Arthur Meyerson. Arthur and I, two colorists who love the colors black gray and white and talk about them as colors.

I’m looking forward to returning to Iceland (and this waterfall) this August to lead a workshops again for Focus On Nature with +Einar Erlendsson , +Ragnar Th. Sigurdsson and +seth resnick .  +Arthur Meyerson Arthur Meyerson will join us at the end of our Iceland workshop for our Arctic Voyage workshop/cruise from Longyearben to Greenland and finally back to Iceland.

We have a few more spaces left our Iceland workshop.

There’s one space left in our Greenland workshop.

There are a two more spaces in my Fine Digital Print Advanced workshop.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

Bambi Cantrell, Douglas Dubler, Greg Gorman, Jay Maisel, Steve McCurry, and Jeff Schewe share their thoughts and feelings on their work and how they relate to it when it’s printed.

View my Epson video interview here.

Find out more about Epson Focal Points here.

Mac Holbert and I concentrate on Fine Art Workflow in our Epson sponsored seminar today in Seattle for ASMP.

Free giveaways include Adobe CS5, NIK HDR Efex Pro, Pixel Genius Photo Kit Sharpener Pro, OnOne Plug In Suite, X-Rite Color Passport, and more.

Find out more about the event here.

View our DVD content here.
Read more in my digital printing lessons.
Learn more in my digital printing workshops.

booksmart_fineartmetals

“Booksmart Studio’s inkjet printable fine art metal allows you to print directly on metal surfaces, the metal has a coating applied to accept most popular inkjet printer inks. These fine art printable metals are offered in aluminum and gold and provide a very durable & luminous print. Users must print with a printer that allows direct pass through for paper. The fine art metal series has an adhesive backing to make mounting an easier process, this adhesive backing is optional in certain sizes. The inkjet printable gold and aluminum allow users to create prints that are unlike any print produced on paper.

Users must overcoat the metal after printing due to then nature of ink sitting on metal, one can coat with Clearstar Coatings for a matte, semi-gloss, or gloss finish. One can also laminate the fine art metals, which is often more accurate and reliable but expensive for initial setup. Waterproof ink will run because the ink sitting on the inkjet coating, please remember to overcoat or laminate your prints.”

Prepared metals come in Satin White, Brushed Silver, Matte Silver, Satin Silver, Satin Gold.

Find out more here.

Learn more about digital printing with my online Lessons.
Learn still more in my DVD Fine Art Digital Printing.
Learn even more in my Fine Art Digital Printing Workshops.

epsonsignatureworthy

“Only the highest quality Epson papers receive the designation of Signature Worthy. Watch the introduction and view the complete interviews to see why these industry leaders choose Epson Signature Worthy Papers.”

Lois Greenfield, David Lynch, Matthew Jordan Smith, Vincent Versace, Art Wolfe tell you what they like best about Epson papers.

Learn more about digital printing with my online Lessons.
Learn still more in my DVD Fine Art Digital Printing.
Learn even more in my Fine Art Digital Printing Workshops.

proofunderglass
It’s an excellent idea to evaluate final proofs under glass (or plexiglass). This is particularly true if you’re using very thick or low grade glass. Often, when see under glass the print appears ever so slightly darker, lower contrast, and sometimes greener. There’s no ideal glass or plexiglass to evaluate proofs with. Use whatever the print will be viewed under. What you want to be able to do is adjust subsequent proofs so they look ideal in the final viewing state of the print, which is rarely bare.

Find out more with my free Lessons.
View more on my DVDs Fine Art Digital Printing and Fine Art Workflow.
Learn more in my Workshops.

Ink Drips or Smears

January 25, 2010 | Leave a Comment |

My Fine Art Digital Printing DVD offers many simple solutions to common problems. Here’s one …

inksmears

Problem
I’m getting spots or streaks of ink on my print(s).

Solution
Clean the print heads, the rollers, and the inside of the printer.

Sometimes excess ink accumulates from previous printing sessions and gets smeared on the next print. This usually only happens when previous print errors have printed off the paper causing problems for the next print, even if it’s printed correctly.

Learn more in my Fine Art Digital Printing Workshops.

Learn what’s unique about black & white and how to best adjust and print it.

Here’s a short excerpt from my DVD.

Learn more in my DVD Black & White Mastery.
Learn more in my Fine Art Digital Printing workshops.

Test Files

December 27, 2009 | Leave a Comment |

Go beyond the limits of color management? Adopt a proofing workflow.

Here’s a short excerpt from my DVD.

Learn more in my DVD The Art of Proofing.
Learn more in my Fine Art Digital Printing workshops.

Signing Prints

December 11, 2009 | Leave a Comment |

pigmanpen

What do you sign prints with?
I recommend …
Pencil for matte surfaces.
Pigmented in for glossy surfaces.
A word of caution, “permanent” simply means waterfast, not light fast.
Sharpee pens fade.
Try Pigma pens instead.
Make sure your signature lasts as long as your prints.

Learn more in my free Lessons.

Learn more in my Fine Art Digital Printing Workshops.


keep looking »

Subscribe

Get the RSS Feed  

Subscribe by Email