Lindblad Cove, Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica, 11 January 2011

 

Jökulsárlón	Iceland	3/2/09. Where the glacier goes to die: Pieces of the great Breidermerkurjokull  washed up on the beach at Jokulsarlon, Iceland. The ice was originally created 500-700 years ago in snowstorms high on the great Vatnajokull Ice Cap. The Breidermerjokull is one of the ice streams draining the ice cap. The ice stream has been retreating since 1930, leaving the tidewater lagoon known as "Jokulsarlon." Calved into Jokulsarlon, the icebergs float across the lagoon, breaking into smaller and smaller pieces as they go, then flow into the waves of the North Atlantic. At high tide, they wash up on the beach, then are taken away by the sea when the high tide returns half a day later. Through the process of destruction, they are contributing, drop by drop, to the rise of global sea level. The chunks of ice have been dubbed "ice diamonds" by James Balog.

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Cryoconite channles 68 deg 31.78'N 49 deg 40.56' W

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Asian elephant (curtain), from SURVIVORS, photographed 1990

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From "Anima", published 1984

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Enjoy this collection of photographs by James Balog.

Learn more about James Balog here.

View more 12 Great Photographs collections here.

Explore The Essential Collection Of Quotes By Photographers.

Explore The Essential Collection Of Documentaries On Photographers.

Premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January and opening in New York and Toronto Nov 9, Chasing Ice is a documentary feature, directed by Jeff Orlowski, that reveals the work of photographer James Balog and his Extreme Ice Survey (EIS) project. Balog, once a skeptic about climate change, discovers through EIS undeniable evidence of a warming world. Chasing Ice features hauntingly beautiful, multi-year time-lapse videos of vanishing glaciers, while delivering fragile hope to our carbon-powered planet.

Find out more about the film here.

A companion book is also now available. ICE: Portraits of the World’s Vanishing Glaciers (288 pages),celebrating the stupendous forms, colors and textures in arctic and alpine landscapes, will be released in the fall of 2012 in collaboration with Rizzoli, the world-renowned publisher of art books. Terry Tempest Williams, one of America’s most distinguished environmental writers and thinkers, will contribute the foreword.

Preview the book ICE here.

Find out more about photographer James Balog here.

James Balog leads an historic photographic project the Extreme Ice Survey.
As a result surprising new data comes to light every year.
It’s a brilliant use of photography and contribution to our global community.

Find out about my Greenland workshop / cruise here.

Find out about my Antarctica workshop / project here.

James Balog speaks on nature photography. Balog is one of the most innovative photographers working in the field. He understands how important it is to challenge conventional perspectives. And he understands the importance of innovation in representation.

Jim Balog has been doing an absolutely fascinating photographic project. He and a team of glaciologists have put cameras around the world and set them to take exposures every hour. The changes they’ve tracked have been astonishing – even to the most learned scientists! You’ve never seen anything like this. Few people have. Until now. This project is important photographically – it’s extended the way photographers work and think about developing projects. The focus on movement/change represented by still photographs, many presented as time lapse series moves us ever closer to blurring the lines between still and video. It’s a project of historic proportions in so many ways.

This project presents important evidence in the quest to understand climate change. Here’s the bottom line. “Over 100 million people live within three feet of sea level—the very amount that experts expect seas to rise by 2100. Cities will spend trillions on coastal defenses, low-lying regions such as Florida and Bangladesh will be devastated, and many island nations will cease to exist. Overall, the consequences will test our ability to adapt like never before.” The debate is not whether climate change is happening. 90% of scientists agree it is. The real debates are how much, how fast, how much is geophysical, how much man contributes, what we can do about it, and are we prepared to react to it.

Watch Extreme Ice here.

Learn more about James Balog here.

Balog ends the series in a place that has captivated me – Iceland.
Check out my Iceland workshop here.

See my work in Antarctica. Images. Text. Book.

Extreme footage from James Balog’s Extreme Ice Survey.


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