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Enjoy this collection of photographs by William Eggleston.

Read 19 great quotes by William Eggleston.

View these documentaries Willaim Eggleston.

View more 12 Great Photographs collections here.

Explore The Essential Collection Of Quotes By Photographers.

Explore The Essential Collection Of Documentaries On Photographers.

Alignment XXXIII

Alignment XXXIII

Alignment XXX

Alignment XXX

Alignment XLIII

Alignment XLIII

Alignment XXXI

Alignment XXXI

Alignment XXXII

Alignment XXXII

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Alignment XXXVI

Interference I

Interference

Interference III

Interference

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Land In Land

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Land In Land

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Antarctica

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Antarctica

This is a selection of my top 12 images of 2017. This selection doesn’t reflect sales, publication, or activities on the web. It simply reflects my opinion. Click on the titles to find out more about each image.

Geography

The locations include Antarctica, New Zealand, Valley Of Fire, Joshua Tree, Obsidian Dome, Death Valley, and Maine.

Process

2017 marks the first year where I produced series of finished works (rather than sketches) with my iPhone, sometimes on location seconds after making exposures. While chasing one series Land In Land (combining macro abstract details with the larger landscapes they were drawn from) another series emerged Interference (combining wave patterns found in dunes into even more complex abstractions).

Concepts

I intensified my efforts to create flatter horizonless abstractions with strong emotionally expressive qualities. Drawn elements successfully found their ways into many of them. The qualities of earth art are even more strongly felt.

Magic Moment

There were truly sublime moments in Antarctica, especially during a few crystal clear days. Still, there were so many moments where I felt deeply moved by and connected to all of these landscapes, and that transformative energy is the true magic. The magic happens inside.

It was a very productive year; more than 75 new works released; more than 150 new studies made; and my first serious forays into making related sculptures. (Stay tuned.)

It’s challenging to choose so few images from so many – but it’s insightful. Try selecting your own top 12 images. Try selecting the top 12 images of your favorite artist(s).

Read The Benefits Of Performing An Annual Image Review here.

View more of my Annual Top 12 Selections here.

View more images from Antarctica here.

Learn about my Antarctica photography workshops here.

View related videos here.

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Enjoy this collection of photographs by Henri Cartier-Bresson.

View more 12 Great Photographs collections here.

Explore The Essential Collection Of Quotes By Photographers.

Explore The Essential Collection Of Documentaries On Photographers.

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Revelation XXXV

In 1996 I completed a series of new images – Revelation. Impossible symmetries drawn forth from desert landscapes, they were unlike anything I’d seen before. Looking at these images, day after day, was like having a dream that never faded. They reminded me of the artifacts I liked so much from the sacred traditions of many primal cultures – totem poles, figurines, costumes, masks, and paintings – not just from the cultures I was exposed to as a boy growing up in New Mexico. The series was good and stood on its own, but I knew then that I still had much more work I wanted to do.

The series has been ongoing for more than twenty years. The series was on my mind when I first went to Antarctica in 2005; I started shooting deliberately for it on a return voyage in 2007; material slowly accumulated in subsequent voyages in 2009, 2011, 2013, and 2015; and then in 2016 it all came together. It wasn’t so much that the material I had gathered that year was just right, what really made the difference was the special point I had come to in my life and work.

These more recent images have an added quality, not solely because they were drawn from a different location, but also because of the passage of time and all the things that happened during it.

In part, this comes from sleeping on it; the subconscious offers many rich and fertile territories.

In part, this is the result of a significant amount of conscious thought; studying craft and composition were only the beginnings for preparing this ground; related reading and viewing enriched me further; having more special experiences with land planted more seeds; digging into my deepest thoughts and feelings about the subject and my approach helped me cultivate them.

In part, this work waited so long is that there was other work to do, including a harvest of related bodies of work (Inhalation and Exhalation). Making that work influenced this work.

In part, this is the result of my inner state now; contrary to what some have suggested, I’ve found this isn’t something to overcome no matter what the current conditions but rather something to be nurtured. These images would have been different if I finished them earlier – because I was different.

While one needs to guard against procrastination, one also needs to guard against rushing through experiences and not developing the necessary depth to fully engage them and do your best work. To reach its full potential, a great wine needs time, neither too little nor too much.

So when is the best time to move forward? This is a question that is best approached with awareness and deep contemplation. Though there are repeatable patterns and common tendencies, there is no one definitive answer to this question for all situations. I’ve found some work gets produced very quickly, sometimes a whole series is made in one shoot, while some work gets produced very slowly, over decades. Ultimately, you have to go with your gut. This doesn’t rule out the possibility and potential benefits of a great deal of research and forethought before you do. The two working in concert together often yield the most powerful combination. However, the single most important ingredient is, not mere spontaneity, which can be short lived, but a true effervescence of spirit, and it’s particularly important to pay attention to this quality if it can be sustained over longer periods of time. You need to be alive to your work to make it come alive.

In our increasingly fast-paced societies, there is a tremendous pressure to produce more and produce it more quickly. This can create a pace that is unsustainable for most creatives, at least when it comes to releasing work with real depth. However well-crafted or clever, there often seems to be something missing in the final results. Good fully developed work takes time … because much like creating deeper relationships with people, it takes time to develop a deeper relationship with your work and your self. Make that time. Savor it. It can make all the difference in the world.

Questions

How many ways can you enrich yourself before you move forward?

At what point does preparation become procrastination?

What signs suggest that this is or isn’t the time?

Find out more about this image here.

View more related images here.

Read more of The Stories Behind The Images here.

PHOTOGRAPH_16

“Issue 16 of PHOTOGRAPH magazine highlights the diversity of vision and creative expression. Issue 16 is a stylish send off (It’s the final issue!), featuring the work of Cynthia Haynes, Karen Divine, David duChemin, Takashi Kitajima, and Alain Laboile, and articles from regular columnists Martin Bailey, John Paul Caponigro, David duChemin, Chris Orwig, and Adam Blasberg. We hope this magazine inspires you to see differently as you continue to hone your vision.”

I discuss Using Psychology To Strengthen Your Composition.

Get your copy here.

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“Issue 15 of PHOTOGRAPH magazine is dedicated to the art of landscape photography and seeks out the ideal web of trees, explores what makes a good impressionistic landscape, catches the perfect wave, and examines at how including yourself in a vast scene can tell bigger photographic stories.

Portfolios and interviews include Ray Collins, a coal miner-turned-award-winning-photographer who’s job injury led to his discovery of seeing the sea from a whole new angle; the calm, impressionistic work of former painter Chris Friel, widely known and respected in the intentional camera movement world for his landscapes; Charles Cramer, a classical pianist who studied with Ansel Adams and developed a deep love for creating beautiful prints; and Paul Zizka, who became widely known for his self-portraiture after including himself in his hard-to-reach landscapes.

Regular contributors John Paul Caponigro, Michael Frye, Guy Tal, Chris Orwig, Martin Bailey, Adam Blasberg, and David duChemin—each recognized for their respective landscapes—have contributed articles on audience, perspective, flexibility, how everyday conversation can spark creativity, the natural landscape as metaphor, optical filters, and how negative space can make a positive impact on your photography.”

Get it here.


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