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PDN PhotoPlus Conference + Expo


“The PDN PhotoPlus Conference + Expo is the largest photography and imaging show in North America, attended by over 24,000 professional photographers and enthusiasts. This year the show will be held Oct. 24-27 at the Javits Center in New York City. Don’t miss your chance to explore over 250 exhibits, see thousands of new products, attend conference seminars, keynote presentations, special events & much more. Register by October 24th for a FREE 3-day expo pass.”
My seminars at PhotoPlus include …
Thu, Oct 25, 2012 – 8:45 AM to 11:45 AM
Fine-Art Digital Printing
Fri, Oct 26, 2012 – 8:45 AM to 11:45 AM
Black & White Mastery
Sat, Oct 27, 2012 – 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM
Game Changers – 12 New Things Every 21st Century Photographer Needs To Know
Find out more about PhotoPlus here,

Beyond ETTR & HDR Tonemapping – 32 Bit In Lightroom

Image by Ragnar th Sigurdsson.

To one degree or another, we’ve all been underexposing our digital photographs, even if we’ve been exposing to the right (ETTR). Imagine a day when every ƒ-stop had as much data as the lightest ƒ-stop. It’s here now. Here’s how.
Make a series of bracketed exposures where each ƒ-stop in a scene is placed in the far right of the histogram or recorded with half the data in a single digital file. Combine all the exposures into a single 32-bit file using either the Merge To HDR Pro feature in Adobe Bridge/Photoshop or Lightroom. Save or import this 32-bit file into Lightroom (4 or higher) and apply adjustments with its Develop module to avoid many common tone-mapping artifacts.
You may be surprised to find that you’ll benefit from using this technique even for images with significantly more restrained dynamic ranges.
Read more on Digital Photo Pro.
Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

Images That "Sizzle And Fizzle" Versus "Sleepers That Are Keepers"

Sizzles & Fizzles

While color immediately grabs attention, other aspects of this image could be stronger and clearer, making its impact less durable than others.

Sleeper

Subtlety makes this image easily overlooked at first but its appeal grows stronger over time and in context with other images.

Keeper

Our strongest images combine immediate impact and staying power.

It happens to me all the time. I’m excited by what I see on location and hopeful about the images I’m making. Afterwards the final results aren’t as exciting as I had hoped they would be. I rarely leave a location with confidence that I have truly excellent images. I can phone in competent and even good most of the time, but getting to great is another matter entirely.
It’s important to know the difference between good and great. I measure my current successes against my past success – I’m always trying to raise the bar. If the images you’re making aren’t making the cut for you, I’d take that as a sign that you’re being more discriminating and based on that I would bet that means you’ve got many more images in your portfolio that are better. That’s excellent! Plus, the world doesn’t need more mediocre images, but it does need more discerning eyes.
While this syndrome of “sizzling and then fizzling” is common. The opposite dynamic is often at work too. You’ll make images that don’t catch your attention immediately but you find yourself doing a double or triple take and your appreciation of these images grows with each viewing. These “sleepers” are very interesting; they tend to be smarter and/or more deeply felt. Because they don’t grab your attention quickly, it’s easy to pass these types of images by. That’s one of the reasons it’s important to look back through your images again, often after some time has passed, so that you can see them from a refreshed perspective.
Sometimes when you present the two together, one type of image makes the other type of image more interesting. The attention getter does just that – it gets attention. It can draw viewers in to seeing related work that might not be as eye catching but has more substance and depth. Similarly, if it’s related to the attention getter, in some way beyond proximity, the strong silent type can reveal hidden depths within its flashier counterpart and even transfer some of its own depth. Both can “rub off” on each other in a beneficial way. Their relationship can be mutualistic.
When you find the rare few images that achieve both immediate high impact and extended durability you’ve got real “keepers”. These are the images that should be celebrated most. These images set the course for many others, both current and future works. All the other images, the ones that come close but fall short, which are collected with the great images, should in some way support, amplify, and expand that greatness. Keep these fires burning and fan the flames. Carry this vital energy forward. Keep this energy flowing with new moves. Find out how long you can stay in the zone or what it takes to return to it or something similar. See how far you can run with it and where it will lead you. Work of this quality often gets beyond you; which doesn’t mean you can’t sustain it, or return to it, but instead means you probably won’t fully understand it until long after you’ve done it – if ever. Work like this expands you. It raises your bar and calls you to new heights. Answer these calls.
Read more in my storytelling resources.
Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

The Graduated Filter and Adjustment Brush In Lightroom 4 – Julianne Kost


Julianne Kost demonstrates the power of making selective adjustments like dodging and burning, color corrections and noise removal using the Graduated Filter and Adjustment Brush in Lightroom 4. Note: although this video was recorded in Lightroom, the same techniques are available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS6.
View more Lightroom videos here.
Learn more from Julianne Kost on her blog.
Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

Photoshop Masking Key Commands


Photoshop key commands make masking faster and easier. Here’s a list of  the most useful ones. The best way to memorize them is to use them. (Note for PC substitute Alt for Option.)
 
The following key commands do not require clicking on the mask.
X                               reverses Foreground and Background colors
Numbers                    number keys change the Opacity of a brush
[ and ]                       makes a brush smaller and  larger
Shift [ and Shift ]       makes a brush softer and  harder
Opt Delete                  fills a mask with the Foreground color
Command I                inverts a mask
 
The following key commands require clicking on the mask.
Control Click                        displays mask options
Opt Click                              displays a mask in black and white
Shift Opt Click                      displays a mask as a red overlay
 
Command Click                    loads the mask as a selection
Shift Command Click            adds the mask to a selection
Option Command Click          subtracts the mask from a selection
Shift Option Command          loads the intersection of two masks
Shift Command I                   inverses a selection
 
Drag & drop                           to move a mask from one layer to another
Option drag & drop                to copy a mask from one layer to another
 
Find more Photoshop masking resources here.
Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

Jerry Uelsmann & Maggie Taylor – This Is Not Photography


“He experiments in a darkroom. She composes on a computer screen. Together, husband-and-wife artists Jerry Uelsmann and Maggie Taylor create haunting, layered dreamscapes that push the boundaries of photography’s possibilities. This documentary from lynda.com explores both the technical and emotional aspects of Jerry’s and Maggie’s work, from the composition to the criticism, with insight from other preeminent voices in photography.”
Find out more about this 1.5 hour documentary at Lynda.com.