Find out more about this image here.

The world is a complex and fast-moving place and we make it more complex and faster every day. The efficient coping mechanisms we have developed to filter and select information to help us to survive and thrive amid an enormous amount of stimulation often get in the way of fully experiencing our environment. Spend some time becoming more aware of the miracles that surrounds you.

Try this meditation.

1               Sit, stand, or move slowly. Do so in a way that you can be undistracted so that you can direct your full attention to your environment.

2               Shift your attention to your vision. Look around you – side-to-side, behind and before you, up and down.

3               Shift your attention to your hearing. Listen to both quiet and loud and near and far sounds.

4               Shift your attention to your sense of smell. Fully experience both pleasant and unpleasant smells.

5               Shift your attention to your sense of touch. Explore the temperature, the air, the ground, the things around you, etc.

6               Become aware of more than one sensation at a time, working to simultaneously integrate them all without prioritizing one over the other.

Simply observe your experiences of your environment. Don’t compare, contrast, evaluate or judge your experiences. Don’t let identifying the things you perceive with labels limit your impressions. If thoughts come to mind, note them and gently let them go. Return your consciousness to your direct experience.

Learn more about meditation with these resources.

Eyes Wide Shut

December 9, 2010 | 1 Comment |



“Seeing with your skin means to use more than just your eyes to observe and listen to others. You can sense with deeper perception and consciousness. Use all of you. The more you can feel, the better you will be at determining how and when to react …” – Joseph Cardillo – Be Like Water

We tap only a small portion of our intelligence. And we have many types of intelligence; visual, verbal, emotional, kinesthetic, etc. Our bodies have a vast intelligence. Tap it. And make your work stronger.

Our five senses are doorways to worlds of wonder. Those who are missing one sense usually developed heightened awareness in the others. You can do the same by closing your eyes.

Close your eyes. Do this for several minutes. What do you hear, feel, smell, taste?

When you open your eyes, make photographs with your other senses in mind. While you are doing this, put your habitual visual routines on hold. Simply experience making images from other perspectives.

Don’t evaluate the images you make in these sessions as you would others. Look for moments that are strongly felt. Successful images of this type are the ones that move you most, not the ones that have the most refined compositions. In them, you’ll find new ways of relating to any subject and the seeds fof many ideas that may bear fruit in the near future, if properly tended.

Later, you can continue making exposures with these previous successes in mind.

The strongest images suggest dimensions beyond the visual. When you look at them, you can imagine smelling Monet’s gardens, tasting a Zubaran still life, feeling the chill of Friedrich’s seascapes, or even hearing Kandinsky’s abstractions.

Your work will be stronger if it becomes equally suggestive.

Find more online resources here.

Learn more in my digital photography workshops.


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