booksmart_fineartmetals

“Booksmart Studio’s inkjet printable fine art metal allows you to print directly on metal surfaces, the metal has a coating applied to accept most popular inkjet printer inks. These fine art printable metals are offered in aluminum and gold and provide a very durable & luminous print. Users must print with a printer that allows direct pass through for paper. The fine art metal series has an adhesive backing to make mounting an easier process, this adhesive backing is optional in certain sizes. The inkjet printable gold and aluminum allow users to create prints that are unlike any print produced on paper.

Users must overcoat the metal after printing due to then nature of ink sitting on metal, one can coat with Clearstar Coatings for a matte, semi-gloss, or gloss finish. One can also laminate the fine art metals, which is often more accurate and reliable but expensive for initial setup. Waterproof ink will run because the ink sitting on the inkjet coating, please remember to overcoat or laminate your prints.”

Prepared metals come in Satin White, Brushed Silver, Matte Silver, Satin Silver, Satin Gold.

Find out more here.

Learn more about digital printing with my online Lessons.
Learn still more in my DVD Fine Art Digital Printing.
Learn even more in my Fine Art Digital Printing Workshops.

Finding the side of a paper that’s optimized for printing can sometimes be challenging. Here are a few tips to help.

1 Look for the logo – the logo is always on the back.
2 Compare whites – the coated side is often whiter.
3 Feel the surface – the coated side is smoother.
4 Lick the paper – the coated side sticks more.
5 Feel the edge – paper is cut coated side up leaving a tiny lip/edge on the back side.

If you have other tips for finding the coated side of paper, comment here!

Learn this and other tips and techniques in my Fine Digital Print workshops series.

Christine’s been working on images of projected light and screens. So she decided to explore presenting her images as screens with projected light. She found some alternate substrates – transparency, transparent material with a translucent backing, tissue paper, glossy film. We did a little brainstorming about presentation. We played with light and shadow. The light and shadow itself took on a presence in the presentation. Essential elements of photography, light and shadow, what photography represents and uses to represent, are beginning to be incorporated into the presentation – sometimes abstractly and dynamically. A whole new set of doors opened up. It’s important to explore the potential of new materials. After all, this is what has propelled photography all along, including fueling the digital revolution.

How many ways can you think of extending printmaking for your work?

These are the kinds of dialogs Mac Holbert and I have every day with participants in our the Fine Art of Digital Printing workshop during our extensive One on One and Review sessions.

Find out about the Hallmark Institute of Photography here.

Find out more about The Fine Art of Digital Printing workshop here.
Find out about my The Fine Digital Printing workshop series here.


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