Julianne Kost demonstrates the seldom talked about features in Lightroom 5 that can make a huge difference in the way that you work with your images.

View more Lightroom videos here.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

Quotes_Artists

Here’s a selection of my favorite quotes on artists.

“The artist is the antenna of the race.” – Ezra Pound

“The aim of every artist is to arrest motion, which is life, by artificial means and hold it fixed so that a hundred years later, when a stranger looks at it, it moves again.” – William Faulkner

“Colour is the keyboard, the eyes are the hammers, the soul is the piano with many strings. The artist is the hand that plays, touching one key or another purposively, to cause vibrations in the soul.” – Wassily Kandinsky

“An artist is a dreamer consenting to dream of the actual world.” – George Santayana

“I suppose an artist takes the elements of his life and rearranges them and then has them perceived by others as though they were the elements of their lives.” – Paul Simon

“Every artist dips his brush in his own soul, and paints his own nature into his pictures.” – Henry Ward Beecher

“The Artist is he who detects and applies the law from observation of the works of Genius, whether of man or Nature. The Artisan is he who merely applies the rules which others have detected.” – Henry David Thoreau

“The highest art is always the most religious, and the greatest artist is always a devout person.” – Abraham Lincoln

“Art is a collaboration between God and the artist, and the less the artist does the better.” – Andre Gide

“To send light into the darkness of men’s hearts – such is the duty of the artist.” – Schumann

“The job of the artist is always to deepen the mystery.”  Francis Bacon

“An artist is not paid for his labor but for his vision.” – James Whistler

“Artists don’t make objects. Artists make mythologies.” – Anish Kapoor

“Every artist was first an amateur.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

“The moment you cheat for the sake of beauty, you know you’re an artist.” – David Hockney

“Even a true artist does not always produce art.” – Carroll O’Connor

“The artist who aims at perfection in everything achieves it in nothing.” – Eugene Delacroix

“Artists who seek perfection in everything are those who cannot attain it in anything.” – Gustave Flaubert

“An artist has to be a little like Lewis and Clark, always exploring in new, uncharted directions.” – C.W. Mundy

“A great artist is always before his time or behind it.” – George Moore

“Every creator painfully experiences the chasm between his inner vision and its ultimate expression.” – Isaac Bashevis Singer

“The greater the artist, the greater the doubt. Perfect confidence is granted to the less talented as a consolation prize.” – Robert Hughes

“Every work of art has its necessity; find out your very own. Ask yourself if you would do it if nobody would ever see it, if you would never be compensated for it, if nobody ever wanted it. If you come to a clear ‘yes’ in spite of it, then go ahead and don’t doubt it anymore.” – Ernst Haas

“Ask yourself if you would do it if nobody would ever see it, if you would never be compensated for it, if nobody ever wanted it. If you come to a clear ‘yes’ in spite of it, then go ahead and don’t doubt it anymore.” – Ernst Haas

“You have brilliance in you, your contribution is valuable, and the art you create is precious. Only you can do, and you must.” – Seth Godin

Read more photographer’s quotes here.

View photographer’s favorite quotes here.

Richard Harrington demonstrates the power of combining detail enhancement and reduction in Photoshop.

View more Photoshop Videos here.

Learn more in my digital printing and digital photography workshops.

Richard Harrington demonstrates how the Blur Gallery filters can be combined. You can adjust how the transition zones, and the Field, Tilt Shift and Iris blurs interact.

View more Photoshop Videos here.

Learn more in my digital printing and digital photography workshops.

Richard Harrington quickly and simply displays the magic offered by Photoshop‘s Blur Gallery.

View more Photoshop Videos here.

Learn more in my digital printing and digital photography workshops.

ConstellationVIII_425

Constellation VIII, Uyuni, Bolivia, 2013

It had been a very long drive. Looking for other exotic locations along the way, we (I was traveling with colleagues Seth Resnick and Eric Meola) had taken the long way around, traveling for five days at high altitude, up to 5,000 meters, through Bolivia’s Altiplano to Salar de Uyuni the largest salt desert in the world. On arrival we began looking for water, which was seasonal and unpredictable. Unsuccessful at first, at first we found only mud beneath a cracked crust, later we found a few wet stains, still later a larger area slick enough to glisten in the sun, much later a larger slick against a mountain that offered limited reflections, and finally, late on the second day we found a large expanse of water. But there was wind and in many areas the water was too deep to access. We waited at our nearby hotel, made completely of salt; the walls and floors and tables and desks and chairs were all made of salt. Returning for the day’s final light, we found the wind had moved the water and then died down leaving a glassy sheet of perfect reflections as far as the eye could see, ringed by clouds. Walking on/in it was disorienting. You felt like you were walking on/in the sky. And then the color began to change and bloom. It was divine. We spent hours photographing, until the light faded and the winds picked up again. We returned the next day, our final day, to find similar almost ideal conditions and later the new introduction of lightning storms and rainbows behind us. We felt exceptionally fortunate.

If there was no rain, there would be no water to hold reflections; we would have been limited to making photographs of cracked salt patterns, a few piles of salt, and the distant mountains. If there were no clouds, there would be little to reflect. Even though this type of weather was typical at this time of year, and this time of year only, there were no guarantees. We had not only timed it just right and planned for enough time to succeed in, we also got lucky.

Stack the odds in your favor and do your research to know when optimal conditions are most likely to occur. There are situations where you can take actions to increase the probability of ideal conditions occurring and there are situations when you can’t – and knowing which situation you’re in is important. In situations where you can’t be more proactive, it’s wise to plan for a little extra time, in case you have to wait for ideal conditions to arise. It’s never easy to know when it’s best to move on and when it’s best to wait it out. Prior experience helps but it will only get you so far. Keep your eye on the weather and seek out local knowledge whenever possible.

Questions

How can you best prepare to make the most of optimal conditions?

What are optimal conditions for the task at hand?

When are you most likely to experience optimal conditions?

Is there anything you can do to increase the likelihood of optimal conditions occurring?

Is there anything you can do to improve current conditions?

When is it better to move forward rather than wait?

When is it better to take a new approach rather than return?

Find out more about this image here.

View more related images here.

Read more The Stories Behind The Images here. 

Find out about my Atacama Desert Argentina digital photography workshop.


keep looking »

Subscribe

Get the RSS Feed  

Subscribe by Email