ContactSheet_Greenland_2013_425

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In reviewing my Greenland 2013 Contact Sheet it’s become even clearer to me that once you get certain kinds of successful shots the bar is raised for your future efforts. There are many good images here. But are they as good or better than other similar images I have, both from Greenland and from Antarctica? If not, why use them? (How many images do I really need? When do the new images draw attention away from old images – for better or for worse?) The answer to this depends on how I plan to use them. Since I have fewer images from Greenland than Antarctica (I’ve only visited it twice while I’ve visited Antarctica six times.), if I were assembling a body of work on Greenland, many of these would make the cut. Since I’m not currently planning on doing this, they have to work within the context of an Arctic/Antarctic project. That project has been on my mind for many years and is still in development. This set isn’t enough to bring it to fruition. For now, I suspect I’ll put most of them on hold possibly using a few for composites.

View more Contact Sheets here.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

(The landscape surrounding Torres Del Paine reminded me so much of the New Mexican landscape I was raised in that I found myself revisiting themes typical of New Mexico in the images I made in Chile.)

During the second part of our Antarctica extension in the famous Torres Del Paine National Park, Chile.

Dirt roads get you into the remote Torres Del Paine National Park (Chile) and to and from its five main regions. The three horns of Torres Del Paine mountains are the most impressive feature of the region, giving the entire range a surreal air. You’ll need a long lens to fill a frame with these key features or to do some serious trekking, which is the best way to experience this park but requires time, equipment, and physical fitness. The landscape surrounding these impressive mountains is arid, dotted with large and small lakes that attract the local fauna – puma, guanaco (one of south america’s five llama species), and a variety of raptors including condor and caracara. Early and late light and weather (fantastic lenticular clouds are common) makes or breaks landscapes here, so plan a visit at the best times of year and plan to spend a little extra time in case you have to wait for conditions to change.

There are five hotels in the park. We stayed at Hosteria Pehoe, charming though a touch run down, this tiny island retreat offers stunning views of the Torres just paces from your room.

A good guide will help you make the most of your visit.

View more maps here,

The highlight of our Patagonia workshop was walking on the glacier Perito Moreno in Los Glaciares National Park, Argentina. Viewing the glacier from a boat is a touristy affair offering limited mobility; if you’re lucky you’ll see a calving. Viewing the glacier from the extensive park observation decks allows you to control your angle of view at your own pace; you can see both the north and south faces. Viewing the glacier while you’re on it offers the best interactivity; there are an unlimited number of angles of view from which you can make images with any focal length, from wide angle surveys, to telephoto excerpts, to intimate macro details. Walking into this frozen wonderland is thrilling! The only thing that could put a damper on a visit like this is heavy rain. You can’t spend enough time there. If you visit the Perito Moreno glacier, my recommendation is to plan for a full day of ice trekking – or more.

The guides for the expedition company HieloYAventura are excellent: they set a warm casual tone; they’re vigilant about safety; they’re all accomplished ice trekkers. HieloYAventura offers three services; Safari Nautico (cruise); Mini-Trekking; and Big Ice, plus customized excursions.

(One other thing, our hotel Posada De Los Alamos was excellent.)

Digital Photo Destinations announces a new workshop exploring the highlights of Torres Del Paine, Patagonia, South America.

4 world-class photographers guide this adventure. Leaders John Paul Caponigro and Seth Resnick will be accompanied by Eric Meola and Arthur Meyerson.

Experience sunset on the Perito Moreno Glacier, the coast of Lake Argentino, Brazo Rico and the Iceberg Channel and all that is just on day 1.

We will also have a full day boat tour in Los Glaciares National Park where we will see the North wall of the Perito Moreno Glacier, the Upsala Glacier, Spegazzini Glacier and Los Tempanos (Icebergs) Channel.

Additional photography sessions include the Grey Glacier, Big Fall, Nordenskjold Lake and Paine River Fall with spectacular views of French Valley, Paine Grande Massif and The Horns and a trip to visit the Blue Lagoon with absolutely magical color.

One of the highlights of this trip will be several trips trekking on glaciers.

Visit Digital Photo Destinations for more information.

It’s over half full now. Only 12  spots are left.

Sign up now!

Contact Paul.Schuster@quarkexpeditions.com

Email jpc@johnpaulcaponigro.com for advance notice on future Digital Photo Destinations events.

Seth Resnick and I are organizing a new Arctic (Iceland, Greenland, and Spitsbergen) digital photography workshop/cruise during the end of August or early September 2012. Our itinerary will be similar to this voyage but customized to maximize photographic opportunities. Geothermals, glaciers, fjiords, icebergs, whales, walrus, and polar bear are only a few of the trip’s highlights. Creativity, exposure, workflow, and post-processing are only a few of the topics presented.

Our Antarctica 2011 digital photography workshop sold out fast!

You can be among the first to reserve a space and get your choice of cabins by requesting to be placed on our pre-announce list.

Simply email info@johnpaulcaponigro.com.

Your contact information will remain confidential.

We’ll alert you with more information as soon as details become firm.

Stay tuned here for more.

Jim Balog’s Extreme Ice Survey breaks new ground photographically.

I visited one of the locations featured in this video recently, Jokullsarlon – Iceland’s glacial lagoon, where I saw changes, and heard of even bigger changes from people who have lived there a lifetime and studied it closely. 40 years ago the ice went to the sea. 30 years ago the lagoon became more visible. Twenty years ago it retreated more. Ten years ago the lagoon was half as long. Today the area is experiencing more dramatic change. Things always change, but glaciologist provide data that things are changing faster than ever today. Fascinating! It’s worth paying attention to.

Find more climate change resources here.

Get priority status in my 2010 Iceland workshop.
Email info@johnpaulcaponigro.com.


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