Mobile Masters, an iPad eBook by Dan Marcolina features 50 of the worlds most notable iPhoneographers. (Caponigro, Eismann, Hollingsworth, Kost, Marcolina and many more.)

Priced at $2.99 this iPad eBook features…

– Over 50 varied Artists from around the world are represented

– Many step-by-step “app-stacking” secrets revealed with a swipe of the figure

– Personal video interviews from 30 artist discussing how iPhoneography has changed them and photography

– Many image tutorial video

– Over an hour of video included

– In-depth text descriptions with direct links to each app mentioned

– Hand selected portfolio of additional work from each artist

– Direct links to each artist websites, blogs, and even email address

Find it here.

I love the spontaneity inherent in smart phone photography. Having a cell phone camera constantly at your side changes the way you see the world. You become more aware of the world around you, taking notice of people, places, things and events that might pass you by unconsidered. You tune in – creatively. If you want to live a more considered life I highly recommend trying cell phone photography. You can quickly and easily capture the moments in between moments. Smartl phone photography offers an invitation to celebrate the ‘smaller’ events in between the ‘larger’ events of your life. There may be a little Zen spirit at work here sometimes it is first shot best shot.

These accumulated moments add up. Over time the products of these stolen moments build something larger. Unintended bodies of work may materialize unexpectedly. The constant pull of brief episodes of creativity may even prepare the way for extended bursts of creativity.

Exercising creativity is like exercising a muscle; the more you practice the stronger you get.

Find more than a dozen images all made in the space of 45 minutes spent wandering the decks of the Russian research vessel Akademik Sergey Vavilov during an arctic cruise from Svalbard to Greenland and Iceland.

View them on The Huffington Post.

Read more iPhone resources here.

Every year I travel with my son and wife to visit her family in Italy. In between moments at the beach, visits to family members houses, and long meals I steal a moment here and there to make photographs, sometimes lagging behind, sometimes rushing ahead, other times ducking around a corner. The environment is very different from the ones I work in professionally. I use this as an opportunity to explore other interests. I find periodically getting out of my comfort zone and exploring other subjects in other environments helps me be a more versatile artistically. The things I learn along the way can later be transposed to my professional work.

How does play inform your image-making?

Here’s a selection of recent images of Italian walls, doors, and windows.

(All of these images were taken and processed with an iPhone.)

 Learn more about iPhone photography in my column on the Huffington Post.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

 

 

How many times have you wished you could quickly straighten lines in an image that have been distorted by perspective? Being able to control perspective is particularly important for architectural photography and it can be used to make stronger compositions in all images.

How many times have you wished you could control the aspect ratio of an image? Making an image more horizontal, square, or vertical or changing an image from one to another can be a powerful tool for creating more expressive images.

One app will do both — FrontView.

Read more at The Huffington Post.

When you want to make a mobile phone image smaller quickly, launch iResize. Why would you want to change the size of an image? There are so many reasons; to email it, to post it online, and/or to share it in social networks are just a few. And with smart phone images growing in size every year, the need to do this is only increasing.

iResize can also change the proportion of an image from horizontal to panoramic, square, or even vertical.

iResize is one of those apps that you can learn instantly and is so easy to use that you’ll quickly overlook how often you use it, which is exactly what makes a go to app.

Read more with step-by-step illustrations on The Huffington Post.

Find iResize on iTunes.

Combining images of music with other images has added a rich new dimension to my creative life and thinking. I don’t mean sequencing a soundtrack to a slideshow; I mean adding the graphic notation found in sheet music.

So that I can make these types of images on the spot, I’ve gathered a collection of photographs of music that I can draw on at a moment’s notice.

Doing this has not only yielded a growing number of compelling images, it has also raised a generative set of questions. In particular, the question of what’s missing or has been eliminated in still images and how that can be either more strongly felt or implied leads to many new ideas and insights.

I find that because I’m engaged in this experiment I notice the ambient sound of the places I’m photographing in more frequently and even photograph different things. My perception of the world becomes richer because I’m paying closer attention to it and to my responses to it.

What experiments will help you add a new or missing dimension to your images?

Read the full article on The Huffington Post.

Visit my iPhone learning center here.

 


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