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The Cousteau Society

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“Founded in 1973 by Captain Jacques-Yves Cousteau, the Society has more than 50,000 members worldwide. Under the leadership of President Francine Cousteau, the Society continues the unique explorations and observations of ecosystems throughout the world that have helped millions of people understand and appreciate the fragility of life on our Water Planet. Half a century of protecting water systems has expanded to embrace a wide variety of programs to encourage communities to achieve sustainable harmony with Nature as the Cousteau Label program.”

“Educating people to understand, to love and to protect the water systems of the planet, marine and fresh water, for the well-being of future generations.”

“To Understand
Through our ship Alcyone’s expeditions to the most sensitive regions of the planet, through movies, books and publications, multimedia technology, conferences and advocacy in international media and meetings as reported in News, through educational programs with Ecotechnie Chairs at the university level and with CousteauKids in the classroom for children.
To Love
Cousteau neigeThrough the link between members of the US- and France-based organizations and through the network of Cousteau Schools. Love for the environment entails diagnosing its needs and tending to it, which come at a price. To maintain their independence, The Cousteau Society and Cousteau Society accept no government subsidies. To finance projects, The Cousteau Society and Cousteau Society rely on the help of individuals. Join us! Help us! The more people who express their commitment to our cause, the more influence we have in the battles that loom ahead.
To Protect
Through the Cousteau Label program for integrated development of the world’s coastal regions, through the petition for an International Court of the Environment and through encouraging potential antagonists to request arbitration of their conflicts by the Permanent Court of Arbitration of The Hague, so that the Rights of Future Generations may be preserved.”

The Essential Collection Of Quotes By Photographers

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We can all learn a lot from the photographers who make the classic photographs.
Here’s a list of links to collections of my favorite quotes by master photographers.
You’ll find them inspiring!
Sam Abell
Berenice Abbott
Ansel Adams
Robert Adams
Diane Arbus
Richard Avedon
Ruth Bernhard
Bill Brandt
Harry Callahan
Keith Carter
Henri Cartier-Bresson
Chuck Close
Wynn Bullock
Edward Burtynsky
John Paul Caponigro
Paul Caponigro
Harold Edgerton
William Eggleston
Alfred Eisendstadt
Elliot Erwitt
Walker Evans
Andreas Feininger
Robert Frank
Lee Friedlander
Emmet Gowin
Ernst Haas
Michael Kenna
Andre Kertesz
Josef Koudelka
David La Chapelle
Jacques-Henri Lartigue
Annie Liebovitz
Jay Maisel
Sally Mann
Robert Mapplethorpe
Joel Meyerowitz
Richard Misrach
James Nachtwey
Irving Penn
John Pfahl
Eliot Porter
Sebastiao Salgado
John Sexton
Cindy Sherman
Stephen Shore
Aaron Siskind
W Eugene Smith
Fredrick Sommer
Edward Steichen
Alfred Steiglitz
Paul Strand
Hiroshi Sugimoto
Joyce Tenneson
George Tice
Jerry Uelsmann
Andy Warhol
Edward Weston
Weegee
Minor White
Gary Winogrand

Read new additions to this collection here.
View The Essential Collection Of Documentaries On Photographers Online here.
Read Photographer’s Favorite Quotes here.

18 Quotes By Photographer Bill Brandt

 
Here’s a collection of my favorite quotes by photographer Bill Brandt.
“It is part of the photographer’s job to see more intensely than most people do. He must have and keep in him something of the receptiveness of the child who looks at the world for the first time or of the traveler who enters a strange country.” – Bill Brandt
“It is the gift of seeing the life around them clearly and vividly, as something that is exciting in its own right. It is an innate gift, varying in intensity with the individual’s temperament and environment.” – Bill Brandt
“Most photographers would feel a certain embarrassment in admitting publicly that they carried within them a sense of wonder, yet without it they would not produce the work they do, whatever their particular field.” – Bill Brandt
“The good photographer will produce a competent picture every time whatever his subject. But only when his subject makes and immediate and direct appeal to his own interests will he produce a work of distinction.” – Bill Brandt
“It is essential for the photographer to know the effect of his lenses. The lens is his eye, and it makes or ruins his pictures. A feeling for composition is a great asset. I think it is very much a matter of instinct. It can perhaps be developed, but I doubt if it can be learned. To achieve his best work, the young photographer must discover what really excites him visually. He must discover his own world.” – Bill Brandt
“A photographer must be prepared to catch and hold on to those elements which give distinction to the subject or lend it atmosphere.” – Bill Brandt
“If there is any method in the way I take pictures, I believe it lies in this. See the subject first. Do not try to force it to be a picture of this, that or the other thing. Stand apart from it. Then something will happen. The subject will reveal itself.” – Bill Brandt
“By temperament I am not unduly excitable and certainly not trigger-happy. I think twice before I shoot and very often do not shoot at all. By professional standards I do not waste a lot of film; but by the standards of many of my colleagues I probably miss quite a few of my opportunities. Still, the things I am after are not in a hurry as a rule.” – Bill Brandt
“But I did not always know just what it was I wanted to photograph. I believe it is important for a photographer to discover this, for unless he finds what it is that excites him, what it is that calls forth at once an emotional response, he is unlikely to achieve his best work.” – Bill Brandt
“Sometimes they are a matter of luck; the photographer could not expect or hope for them. Sometimes they are a matter of patience, waiting for an effect to be repeated that he has seen and lost or for one that he anticipates.” – Bill Brandt
“I am not very interested in extraordinary angles. They can be effective on certain occasions, but I do not feel the necessity for them in my own work. Indeed, I feel the simplest approach can often be most effective. A subject placed squarely in the centre of the frame, if attention is not distracted from it by fussy surroundings, has a simple dignity which makes it all the more impressive.” – Bill Brandt
“Photographers should follow their own judgment, and not the fads and dictates of others.” – Bill Brandt
“And only the photographer himself knows the effect he wants. He should know by instinct, grounded in experience, what subjects are enhanced by hard or soft, light or dark treatment.” – Bill Brandt
“I consider it essential that the photographer should do his own printing and enlarging. The final effect of the finished print depends so much on these operations.” – Bill Brandt
“No amount of toying with shades of print or with printing papers will transform a commonplace photograph into anything other than a commonplace photograph.” – Bill Brandt
“Photography is not a sport. It has no rules.” – Bill Brandt
“Photography is still a very new medium and everything must be tried and dare.” – Bill Brandt
Read more Photographers’ Quotes here.
View Photographer’s Videos here.

14 Quotes By Photographer Andre Kertesz

 
Here’s a selection of my favorite quotes by photographer Andre Kertesz.
“I am an amateur and I intend to stay that way for the rest of my life.” – Andre Kertesz
“I do what I feel, that’s all, I am an ordinary photographer working for his own pleasure. That’s all I’ve ever done.” – Andre Kertesz
“Photography is my only language.” – Andre Kertesz
“The camera is my tool. Through it I give a reason to everything around me.” – Andre Kertesz
“Everything is a subject. Every subject has a rhythm. To feel it is the raison d’être. The photograph is a fixed moment of such a raison d’être, which lives on in itself.” – Andre Kertesz
“I am a lucky man. I can do something with almost anything I see. Everything is still interesting to me.” – Andre Kertesz
“I can’t talk about my style. It us kind of difficult for me. I don’t like styles. I only like taking photos and expressing myself through them.” – Andre Kertesz
“If you want to write you should learn the alphabet. You write and write and in the end you hava a beautiful, perfect alphabet. But it isn’t the alphabed that is important. The important thing is what you are writing, what you are expressing. The same thing goes for photography. Photographs can be technically perfect and even beautiful, but they have no expression.” – Andre Kertesz
“Technique isn’t important. Technique is in the blood. Events and mood are more important than good light and the happening is what is important.”- Andre Kertesz
“The moment always dictates in my work. What I feel, I do. This is the most important thing for me, Everybody can look, but they don’t necessarily see. I never calculate or consider; I see a situation and I know that it’s right, even if I have to go back to get the proper lighting.”- Andre Kertesz
“I am an amateur and intend to remain one my whole life long. I attribute to photography the task of recording the real nature of things, their interior, their life. The photographer’s art is a continuous discovery which requires patience and time. A photograph draws its beauty from the truth with which it’s marked. For this very reason I refuse all the tricks of the trade and professional virtuosity which could make me betray my career. As soon as I find a subject which interests me, I leave it to the lens to record it truthfully. Look at the reporters and at the amateur photographer! They both have only one goal; to record a memory or a document. And that is pure photography. – Andre Kertesz
“The most valuable things in a life are a man’s memories. And they are priceless.” – Andre Kertesz
“I do not document anything, I give an interpretation.” – Andre Kertesz
“Seeing is not enough; you have to feel what you photograph.” – Andre Kertesz
Read more Photographers’ Quotes here.
View Photographer’s Videos here.

Contact Sheet – Iceland 2014

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There were many surprises on our recent DPD workshop in Iceland. Anticipating auroras we encountered heavy weather, which we expertly dodged with resourcefulness of our hosts at Focus On Nature.
In the images I made during this week I found something old and something new. I revisited a few old themes – reflections and ripples. I connected new themes – contrails and tire tracks. But the bird’s eye views we saw during one hour of aerials both over frozen highlands and along flowing rivers were the most captivating. Related to aerial images I’ve produced in Namibia, I’m sure now that this kind of photography is something I’ll do much more of in the future.
That said, it’s really the relationship between a new image of a wave and an earlier one of a waterfall that excites me most. I thought that I hadn’t found what I was looking for, great images of auroras. But when I saw this wave repeatedly crashing into the air, I realized I actually found what I’d been looking for for quite some time. Expect the unexpected?
 View more Contact Sheets here.
View Seth Resnick’s images from the same voyage here.
Learn more about my digital printing and digital photography workshops.

Contact Sheet – Morocco 2014

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I anticipated being out of my comfort zone for the majority of my recent DPD adventure to Morocco. As a surreal landscape photographer I’ve had very little experience with street photography and portraiture. It was great practice. I did better than I expected. Practice makes better. While I don’t plan to release any of these images, my vision and skills are stronger for having made them. The questions that were asked and clarified were the most important. “What kind of chemistry is necessary for an authentic event to happen?” “How many ways can you start chemical reactions?” “How long does it take?” “In which peak moment is this most intensely felt?” “How do the images you make reflect your personal relationship to the subject?” Ironically, it might be easier to answer these questions when photographing people than landscapes, but they’re equally valid for both.
I anticipated the days in the deep deserts to be the most personally productive – and I’ve got some good raw material to work with. It’s unfinished. This raises, another good question. “When is work complete enough?” But I made one rough composite, which gave me proof of concept. Though I’m sure there will be surprises along the way, I know where the work is going and what it will take to complete it.
View more Contact Sheets here. 
View Seth Resnick’s images from the same adventure here.
Learn more about my digital printing and digital photography workshops.