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Print presentation is the final aspect of fine art printing. Mounting, mats, framing, portfolios, bodies of work, environment, light. All of these things affect the way a work of art is perceived by viewers. They might seem like incidental after thoughts but they’re actually integral components of making artistic statement – and it often provides necessary protection ensuring a work of art endures. The most beautiful prints in the world will become more beautiful with appropriate presentation – or fade away without it.

Check out my series of articles on print presentation in Photoshop User and on my website.

Learn more at Brooks here.

Be the first to hear about the next FADP workshop.

Stay tuned to Insights for the upcoming release of our Fine Art Workflow DVD.

Check out Mac Holbert’s website.

Find out more in my Fine Art Digital Printing Workshops.

visualpoetry

Chris Orwig shared many insights in an inspiring lecture during our FADP workshop at Brooks. Chris collects great stories from photographers and shares them in his new book Visual Poetry.

In one story, a man has written a novel and decides it’s no good so he throws it out. As she’s taking out the trash, his wife discovers the manuscript and reads it. She goes to him and says he needs to finish it – it’s good. He does. It becomes a best seller.

Chris thinks we all need ‘trash can buddies’. I agree.

Find out more about Chris Orwig here.

Learn more at Brooks here.

Be the first to hear about the next FADP workshop.

Stay tuned to Insights for the upcoming release of our Fine Art Workflow DVD.

Check out Mac Holbert’s website.

Find out more in my Fine Art Digital Printing Workshops.

svetlanatwave

Svetlana Tepavcevic makes abstract black and white images of waves that look like ink paintings.

We discussed the importance of scale and presentation agreeing that classic photographic small scale matted approaches reduced the impact of the images. A larger scale with a different presentation format will highlight the more painterly concerns of these images. So will appropriate materials – something matte and fibrous.

The source files aren’t super high resolution, but that’s a non-issue because the treatment of the subject supports substantial upsampling. It’s another case of how the “rules” are only useful guidelines that identify significant considerations and raise important questions but there are always exceptions. They say “Exceptions prove the rule.” And, there’s an art to knowing when to make them.

See more of Svjetlana Tepavcevic’s work here.

Learn more at Brooks here.

Be the first to hear about the next FADP workshop.

Stay tuned to Insights for the upcoming release of our Fine Art Workflow DVD.

Check out Mac Holbert’s website.

Find out more in my Fine Art Digital Printing Workshops.

Read more

destination

One of the key concepts Mac Holbert and I emphasize in our digital printing workshops is developing a clear sense of destination before you start editing a file. Once you have a sense of destination what you need to do to an image becomes much clearer. Without a sense of destination you may end up wandering aimlessly. Your personal style may influence the route you take but you’ll know what steps you need to take to get where you want to go. First you have to know where you want to go. Your artistic intention determines objectives, outcomes, and procedures. There may be many ways to get there – different tools to choose from and ways to apply them during your workflow – but with a clear sense of destination you’ll be able to more easily make meaningful choices that fulfill your vision.

Learn more at Brooks here.

Be the first to hear about the next FADP workshop.

Stay tuned to Insights for the upcoming release of our Fine Art Workflow DVD.

Check out Mac Holbert’s website.

Find out more in my Fine Art Digital Printing Workshops.

Read more

You can learn from two master digital print makers at the same time, fresh off their highly successful tour in the Epson Print Academy, in The Fine Art of Digital Printing workshop. It’s the chance of a lifetime.

The Fine Art of Digital Printing workshop with John Paul Caponigro and Mac Holbert (supported by Epson) returns in 2009 after four highly successful events. August 31 – September 4 and October 26 – 30 at the Brooks Institute of Photography in Santa Barbara, CA. Space is limited to 24 participants and made available on a first-come-first-serve basis. The event was so popular in 2008 and 2009 it sold out within days.

Visit thefineartofdigitalprinting.com to learn more and to sign up for the workshop or waiting list.

Schedule

Seminar style sessions are run morning, afternoon, and evening with breaks only for lunch and dinner.

Topics covered include …

Color Management
Proofing
Workflow
Raw Conversion
Noise Reduction
Sharpening
Media Choices
Print Presentation
One-On-One Reviews

And much, much more!

The workshop emphasizes hands on productivity. Late nights are spent in the lab producing work while Mac and JP conduct one-on-one review sessions.

Included with the workshop are John Paul’s workshop DVD (packed with exercises, reading, test files, and actions) and Mac and JPs handouts (a binder compiling the best of their years of relevant writings).

This workshop is right for those who want to master digital printmaking and take their digital imaging skills to the next level. This workshop has a strong photographic perspective but is applicable to all types of artists who want to reproduce their work in digital media. Intermediate skill levels with Photoshop are required. Lightroom is covered but not required.

Check out Mac’s website with free resources here.
Check out Mac’s book here.
Check out Mac’s DVD here.
Check out my conversation with Mac here.
Check out my DVDs here.
Check out my free printing PDFs here.
Check out my other Printing workshops here.
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