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Social networks can be wonderful ways of sharing events in our lives, with or without images. Most posts are seen, commented on, and shared more if they include an image.

Some posts are just images. And there are social networks just for images. This all creates an insatiable demand for images, specifically photographs. Now, over one trillion photographs are made every year. (For the past several years, each year more photographs are created in the current year than in all previous years combined.)

Usually when photographs are shared there is no indication of what kind of photograph it is. They’re all shared equally, almost as if they’re all equal and all made for the same reasons, which they’re not. Never mind that some photographs are of higher quality than others. Making this kind of value judgment is another matter entirely – and not the point here. The point here is that we make many different kinds of photographs for many different reasons. (We quickly disregard the imperfections in family snapshots, sometimes they feel more real and immediate because of them, favoring instead their accuracy and spontaneity. We evaluate and use formal portraits in entirely different ways.) How successful photographs are is determined by how well they do what we want them to do. There is no one set of criteria that can be applied equally to all photographs; instead we apply different criteria to different kinds of photographs.

They shouldn’t all be read the same. If we looked at all photographs as being the same, and if we looked at all photographs in the same ways, we’d make many inaccurate conclusions and miss many important points.

So it’s important to ask, “How do we want the photographs we share to be received?”

Can we make it easier by taking some of the guesswork out of it all and tell our viewers more about what we’re trying to say by telling them more about how we’re trying to say it? There aren’t standard conventions for this – yet. (And we need them.)

In an attempt to embrace the challenge of communicating what kinds of photographs I share, I’ve started using specific language to describe and ways of presenting different types of photographs differently.

Here’s my current solution.

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Documents are shared bare with no border.

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Studies made during the development of more resolved work are shared with a textured paper border.

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Fine art is shared with a matt and frame.    

It takes a little extra time to add these touches but I think it’s worth the effort. In the end, I feel I’m communicating more effectively. I also find making the distinction between these types of images personally useful. I become clearer about what I’m trying to do, often while I’m making photographs. I’m better able to assess how well I’ve done what I’m trying to do and don’t waste time and energy applying an inappropriate set of criteria; sometimes this affects both productivity and how I make photographs. And finally, because I ask these questions I find new ideas – and that may be the most rewarding part of this process.

How do you share images in social networks?

Follow me on Instagram.

Like me on Facebook.

Follow me on Twitter.

Circle me on Google+.

Photoshelter offers a number of free useful guides for photographers.

Their The Photographer’s Social Media Handbook offers a useful quick strategic survey as well as lots of useful tidbits that almost any photographer can benefit from.

Download it here.

Circle me on Google+ hère.

Follow me on Twitter here.

Like me on Facebook here.

Follow me on Pinterest here.

 

Wow! Cool! Amazing! Fantastic! Beautiful! Great image! I love it! You can feel the love online — on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Flickr, Picasa, Instagram, 500pix, BestCamera, and countless other image-sharing services, social networks, blogs, and websites. It feels good to give and receive praise. It can be motivating!

Ask For It

Do you want more love? Ask for it! There’s an implicit request for feedback when you post an image online, where people can comment on what you post. But, when you post images without a request for feedback, the number of responses you get goes down. Without an invitation, people may be hesitant to give you feedback. Or, they may not know how far to go and end up not going far as you’d like them to. So, if you’re looking for feedback when you post your work — ask for it. You’ll find people are quite happy to share their opinions with you.

Be More Specific

Love may not be the only thing you’re looking for. If you’re looking for more than love, there are many ways to find it. The way you ask for feedback can make a big difference in the kind of responses you get and how useful they are. If you don’t make a specific request, the responses you get will be general and unfocussed. Conversely, you can qualify the type of feedback you’re giving someone. State your approach before giving your feedback.

Ways To Give Feedback

There are as many ways to direct the kind of feedback you get as there are ways to give feedback. Here’s a list of eleven different kinds of feedback and ways to ask for it. You can ask the questions of either single images or groups of images. (You can even use this list to easily copy and paste questions when you post images online. Or make your own!) …

Read my full post on The Huffington Post.

Read more related posts on cell phone photography on The Huffington Post.

“Earth Day Network today announced a collaboration with Facebook to engage people worldwide in environmental action through the Billion Acts of Green®campaign.  The two organizations worked together to create a new application or “app” that is inspiring people around the world to take actions to reduce their impact on the environment.

A Billion Acts of Green®is a global campaign that drives voluntary efforts to improve our environment.  It encourages individuals and organizations to undertake acts of environmental service and advocacy, and to share them with the world. These actions can be immediate changes like switching to energy efficient light bulbs, or large-scale projects that achieve lasting change, such as efforts to green our cities and our schools.”

Learn more about 1 Billion Acts of Green here.

Join 1 Billion Act of Green here.

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Want to connect with other alumni on Facebook?

Join John Paul Caponigro’s Alumni Facebook Group today.

Share your stories, get feedback, learn, make new friends.

New Facebook Terms

April 10, 2009 | Leave a Comment |


New York magazine currently has a great article on important recent developments on Facebook. Do You Own Facebook? Or Does Facebook Own You? by Vanessa Grigoriadis.

Facebook recently changed usage terms (they expanded their ability to use member contributed content – even after members left Facebook). Members protested and a user group was started to protest; it now has nearly 150,000 members. Facebook responded and reverted to the old terms, temporarily. Facebook then rewrote new terms (broader usage terms, that terminate when members leave Facebook); these new terms are now up for vote by all Facebook members. Facebook will make a public statement April 10. Facebook will put the new document to a vote by all users by April 20.

You can get involved.
If you use Facebook, I recommend you do.

See the Facebook Group – People Against the new Terms of Service (TOS)

Join the Facebook Bill of Rights & Responsibilities here.

If you’re an alumni of my seminars and/or workshops you can join my Alumni Facebook Group here.


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