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John Paul Caponigro’s Open Studio | New Work 2014 is open to the public for one weekend only – August 2nd and 3rd from 10 am to 5 pm with a talk by the artist at 2 pm. (Afterward, visits by appointment are available.)

This annual event unveils new highlights from the artist’s recent international travels north of the Arctic Circle and south of the Antarctic Circle with stops along the way in Iceland, Argentina, Morocco, and Namibia. Amid images of glowing auroras, crashing glaciers, colliding icebergs, thundering waterfalls, smoldering volcanoes, shimmering salt flats, shifting dunes, you’ll find the oldest desert, the largest salt flat, the windiest continent, the fastest moving glaciers, the wildest seas and more, all portrayed through the eyes of this unique artist.

This is a rare opportunity to view the artist’s new work presented in his own private studio / gallery. Come enjoy prints, drawings, paintings, books, and conversations with the artist during this very special event. Many of these items have never been seen before and some are often not made public.

For more information including previews, reviews, statements, audio, video, and press kit email info@johnpaulcaponigro.com.

Click here for directions.

View the slideshow here.

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Enjoy two inspiring exhibits by internationally acclaimed artist John Paul Caponigro - Around The World & Process.

Around the world unveils new highlights from his recent international travels north of the Arctic Circle and south of the Antarctic Circle with stops along the way in Iceland, Argentina, Bolivia, and Namibia Amid images of glowing auroras, crashing glaciers, colliding icebergs, thundering waterfalls, smoldering volcanoes, shimmering salt flats, shifting dunes, you’ll find the oldest desert, the largest salt flat, the windiest continent, the fastest moving glaciers, and more, all portrayed through the eyes of this unique artist.

Process displays many aspects of the artist’s creative process, both analog and digital – writing, drawing, painting, photography. John Paul shows how each discipline contributes to the completion of his finished works of art. This exhibit shows how artist’s get there is just as important as where they arrive and reveals that the creative process is a never-ending journey of discovery that offers many insights along the way.

The book Process is now available in print and electronically. It shows many more works than can be displayed and shares the personal insights of the artist. Preview it online at johnpaulcaponigro.com/store.

John Paul Caponigro’s Annual Exhibition 2013: Around The World and Process is a rare opportunity to view this artist’s work presented in his own private studio / gallery. The exhibit is open to the public for one weekend only – August 3rd and 4th from 10 am to 5 pm with a talk by the artist at 2 pm.

Come enjoy prints, drawings, paintings, books, and conversations with the artist during this very special event.

Preview select new works online here.

For more information including directions, previews, reviews, statements, audio, video, and press kit visitwww.johnpaulcaponigro.com or email info@johnpaulcaponigro.com.

Get directions here.

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See more images here.

Mentor Exhibition Invite

Artists learn and hone their craft in many ways, but perhaps no relationship is more instructive and lasting than one built with a mentor. Sharing a lifetime of knowledge with another artist—from favorite techniques and tools of the craft to inspiring self-criticism and deeper motivation—mentors can propel an artist forward, illuminate new creative territory and serve as a guide through periods of self-doubt.

For 40 years, Maine Media has fostered relationships between emerging and established artists through its intense and immersive courses, building bonds between teachers and students that have lasted decades and spanned the globe. Maintaining their relationships long after the lessons have ended, many of our students have gone on to become masters in their own right, and now pass on their knowledge to a new generation of emerging artists.

As part of the yearlong celebration marking our 40th anniversary, we are thrilled to announce the upcoming exhibition,Mentor: 40 Photographers, 40 Years, in partnership with the Center for Maine Contemporary Art. The exhibition will feature the work of some of Maine Media’s best-known master teachers alongside the work of their students, who continue the connection with Maine Media through teaching and mentoring.

Curated by Bruce Brown and Brenton Hamilton, Mentor will be on display from July 27 to September 22, 2013 at the Center for Maine Contemporary Art here in Rockport. We hope you will join us at the opening reception on July 27, or at the alumni reception on August 10 to celebrate the spirit of creative collaboration that is at the heart of everything we do here at Maine Media.

Find out more about the Mentor Exhibit here.

Learn about my Annual Exhibit here.


May 8 – June 1, 2013

Opening Reception Tuesday, May 7, 6-8 pm

Soho Photo Gallery is presenting a special exhibition during the month of May entitled “Seeing the Unseen: Equivalence in Photography” featuring 13 Soho Photo artists and guest artist John Paul Caponigro.

“Equivalence in photography is a term that sprang from the title Equivalents, which Alfred Stieglitz gave a series of his cloud photographs that he felt were like visual music. In this way, a tradition began of using what is seen to express an inner state or feeling that cannot be seen. This aspect of photography continues to evolve. As Minor White said, ‘The equivalent is one of those ideas that in practice grows by the efforts and accomplishments of the people who explore it.’ Today, photographers explore the ability of a photograph to use the immanent to convey the transcendent, expressing what might otherwise be ineffable.”

Preview the catalog here.

Read my essay Equivalence here.

Equivalence

May 1, 2013 | 2 Comments |

The idea of equivalence in photography is richly rooted in a time when photography was beginning to discover its own nature and continues to be a powerful force for discovering our own nature, which is greater than we think.

Alfred Stieglitz first used the term equivalent as a title for a series of photographs of clouds, whose aspirations were more musical than representational, and to describe a particular kind of activity in art and its result, “My photographs are ever born of an inner need – an Experience of Spirit … I have a vision of life, and I try to find equivalents for it sometimes in the form of photographs.”  In stating that his photographs have power “not due to subject matter” he suggested that photography, capable of but not limited to abstraction, can move beyond transcription without abandoning verisimilitude. The visible can be used to reveal the invisible; the external can be used to reveal the internal.

Extending what Stieglitz started, Minor White stated, “When a photograph is a mirror of the man, and the man is a mirror of the world, then Spirit might take over.” Equivalence embraces and elevates the debate over whether photographs are windows (onto the world) or mirrors (into the soul) and whether they are taken (through distant observation, objective to varying degrees) or made (through immediate interaction, subjective to varying degrees), illuminating many more levels of an evolving process. Through equivalence the photographic object created becomes a reflection of both the external things it represents and the internal states of its creator. This reflective capacity is extended to the viewers, who re-experience this shared process in their own ways.

White remarked, “One should photograph things not only for what they are but also for what else they are.” and “Equivalence is a function, not a thing.” He did not mean to suggest that equivalence was merely a rhetorical device. Equivalence is more than a rhetorical device, not a simile that suggests shared commonalities (this is like that), not a metaphor that observes shared qualities through the power of transformation (this is that), but a process inclusive and transcendent of both. Like a simile its power starts with the recognition of shared qualities and like a metaphor its power lies in transformation, but an equivalent transcends both through a heightened state of self-awareness, even to the point of transforming the self through its accompanying effects of clarity and commitment.

A change of perspective is a change in state. Jean Piaget reminds us that, “What we see changes what we know. What we know changes what we see.” Perception changes reality – if only but not necessarily only because we are a part of reality. The more conscious the perception the stronger the change. Furthermore, the quality of consciousness one engages perception with influences what is perceived, what is produced, how it is received and the consequences that has. Acting on what one observes, choosing and sustaining one thing / quality amid many others, reinforces that state of being and this is particularly true if during observation one creates something tangible and durable and never more true if multiple related works are created. Often, during the process of manifestation perception continues to change, further extending this process of revelation and transformation.

Resonance is a consequence of equivalence. What we create can transform us. We then become cocreators, creating not only things and ideas but selves. What we create can also transform others, triggering cascades of sympathetic vibrations, if we imbue our creations with a persistent resonance, brought on by intensity, clarity and connection (connection to subject, medium, self, and others). Through the experience of art, the powers of perception and transformation can be awakened, in both the ones who create directly and the ones who reperceive indirectly. Just as whether something is seen or unseen depends on a degree of sympathetic vibration, whether this capacity is activated depends on whether an equivalent resonance is produced in the viewer, which is influenced by the clarity and intensity of transmission and the capacity of the viewer to receive it. In this process, the connections between all things are highlighted. In this light, photography, like all forms of art and many other disciplines, is an agent for heightened perception and thus an agent for change.

Equivalence is born out of a state of being and the equivalent is a record of and a catalyst for that state of being, which can be reenacted by others. Equivalence is a process of revealing and exploring not only our greater nature but also our connection to and unity with a greater spirit / energy field. Equivalence is a shared lived process of revelation and transformation. Equivalence is not a process reserved only for photography, it is possible in every medium, it is not only for artists, but for each and every individual. It is universal. The question that still burns is not does it happen, but when it happens how intensely and with what quality does it happen?

Stieglitz set a shining example for us all. He demonstrated that the full power of our photographs lies not in special subjects or moments but in what we bring to the picture, which can be much more than technical skill, compositional prowess, and cultural awareness. Through photography we can simultaneously bear witness to things / events, affirm our connection / participation with them (even if only as observers, no small thing), and clarify our understanding / interpretation of the confluence of everything that is brought to bear in each moment and the continuing resonances they produce. More than an intellectual interpretation or emotional expression, this is a process of holistic integration. The photograph can be much more than a material trace of another material; it can even be much more than a trace of light and time; it can also be a trace of spirit, the energetic confluence of body, mind, and emotion, either single or multiple.

White reminds us that this process of self-realization is open to everyone, “With the theory of Equivalence, photographers everywhere are given a way of learning to use the camera in relation to the mind, heart, viscera and spirit of human beings. The perennial trend has barely been started in photography.” Though all photographers do it, not all photographers do it with equal clarity or intensity. Regardless of what level they engage this process, whenever photographers break through to new levels of consciousness the results are transformative for the photographer and the viewer and even the viewed, sometimes subtly and sometimes dramatically.

Read Minor White’s essay Equivalence: The Perennial Trend.

The exhibit Seeing The Unseen: Equivalence In Photography opens in NYC at Soho Photo Tuesday, May 7.

Exhibit – Two Generations / Father & Son

Opening Reception: March 28, 2013, 5–6:30 pm

March 20 – April 10, 2013

Manchester, NH

New Hampshire Institute Of Art

French Building Gallery

“The works of father and son Paul Caponigro and John Paul Caponigro are featured in the photographic exhibit “Two Generations.” Over twenty images by each artist highlight the two careers of this family of artists. The juxtaposition of traditional darkroom images and the more contemporary digital photographs may seem startling at first. Both artists utilize a different medium and a different vision. Paul is a traditional straight shooter and John is a process artist. After careful inspection what is more apparent are the similarities, the vestiges of the fact that this is the work of father and son. It is apparent each artist’s work influences the other and many of their key interests are the same. Both artists share a deep reverence for nature, a love of stone, a fascination with the subtle palettes of the natural environment, and a strong dedication to their craft.”

Find out more here.

This is one of the best exhibits I’ve seen in ages!

“While digital photography and image-editing software have brought about an increased awareness of the degree to which camera images can be manipulated, the practice of doctoring photographs has existed since the medium was invented. Faking It: Manipulated Photography Before Photoshop at The Metropolitan Museum of Art (NYC) is the first major exhibition devoted to the history of manipulated photography before the digital age. Featuring some 200 visually captivating photographs created between the 1840s and 1990s in the service of art, politics, news, entertainment, and commerce, the exhibition offers a provocative new perspective on the history of photography as it traces the medium’s complex and changing relationship to visual truth.

The photographs in the exhibition were altered using a variety of techniques, including multiple exposure (taking two or more pictures on a single negative), combination printing (producing a single print from elements of two or more negatives), photomontage, overpainting, and retouching on the negative or print. In every case, the meaning and content of the camera image was significantly transformed in the process of manipulation.

Faking It is divided into seven sections, each focusing on a different set of motivations for manipulating the camera image …  “Picture Perfect”, “Artifice in the Name of Art”, “Politics and Persuasion”m “Novelties and Amusements”, “Pictures in Print”, and “Protoshop.”

The exhibit runs from October 11, 2012 through January 27, 2013.

Find out more about the exhibit here.

Whether you can or can’t see the exhibit, get the book.

The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated, 296-page catalogue written by Mia Fineman.

“Photographic manipulation is a familiar phenomenon in the digital era. What will come as a revelation to readers of this captivating, wide-ranging book is that nearly every type of manipulation we associate with Adobe’s now-ubiquitous Photoshop software was also part of photography’s predigital repertoire, from slimming waistlines and smoothing away wrinkles to adding people to (or removing them from) pictures, not to mention fabricating events that never took place. Indeed, the desire and determination to modify the camera image are as old as photography itself—only the methods have changed.

By tracing the history of manipulated photography from the earliest days of the medium to the release of Photoshop 1.0 in 1990, Mia Fineman offers a corrective to the dominant narrative of photography’s development, in which champions of photographic “purity,” such as Paul Strand, Edward Weston, and Henri Cartier-Bresson, get all the glory, while devotees of manipulation, including Henry Peach Robinson, Edward Steichen, and John Heartfield, are treated as conspicuous anomalies. Among the techniques discussed on these pages—abundantly illustrated with works from an international array of public and private collections—are multiple exposure, combination printing, photomontage, composite portraiture, over-painting, hand coloring, and retouching. The resulting images are as diverse in style and motivation as they are in technique. Taking her argument beyond fine art into the realms of politics, journalism, fashion, entertainment, and advertising, Fineman demonstrates that the old adage “the camera does not lie” is one of photography’s great fictions.”

Preview the book here.

 

In an inspiring dual exhibit Maine / Process & Place, John Paul Caponigro collects images drawn from over 23 years of living in Maine and offers a rare look into his unique creative process.

Place displays works made of the natural wonders of Maine; from Acadia National Park to Monhegan Island, from Rockland to Pemaquid Point, from Schoodic Peninsula to Popham Beach. You’re sure to recognize many of your favorite places, though you may never have seen them like this – through the eyes of this unique artist in his signature style.

Process displays many aspects of the artist’s creative process – drawing, painting, photography, Photoshop, iphoneography, writing and more. John Paul shows how each discipline contributes to the completion of his finished works of art. This exhibit reveals that the creative process is a never-ending journey of discovery that offers many insights along the way and that an artist’s creations are and come out of far more than the
activities in their primary medium. How artist’s get there is just as important as where they arrive.

Process, a new catalog that accompanies the exhibit, shows many more works than can be displayed and shares the personal insights of the artist. Preview it online at johnpaulcaponigro.com.

The exhibit John Paul Caponigro’s Maine / Process & Place is a rare opportunity to view this internationally acclaimed artist’s work presented in his own private studio / gallery.

The exhibit is open to the public for one weekend only – August 4th and 5th from 10 am to 5 pm with artist’s talks at 2 pm.

Come enjoy prints, books, web galleries, performances and conversations with the artist during this very special event.

For more information including directions, previews, reviews, statements, audio, video, and press kit visit www.johnpaulcaponigro.com or email info@johnpaulcaponigro.com.

Charles Adams (my assistant both in the studio and in the field) is having his first exhibition this coming Friday, May 4th at Asymmetrick Arts in Rockland, Maine. It will run until May 25th.

24  of his images will be on display, along with sculpture from artist Vic Goldsmith. For those that cannot make the opening, there will also be an Artist talk on May 19th.

May 4 – 25
Asymmetrick Arts
405 Main Street, Rockland ME
207.954.2020

Learn more about Charles Adams and view his images here.

Visit Asymmetrick Arts here.


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