Julieanne Kost discusses how the addition of color as well as supporting imagery can help reinforce the mood and message of a composite image that a single photograph may fail to do on it’s own.

View more CS5 Videos here.

Learn more in my DVDs Photoshop Color Tools and Photoshop Color Strategies.

Learn more in my digital photography workshops.

“Paola Antonelli, MoMA’s curator of Architecture and Design, provides insights into where design is headed both as a creative discipline and as a tool for making sense of the world. In this interview, she talks about the vision behind her upcoming exhibit at MoMA, Talk To Me, “We may not think about it consciously on a day to day basis, but objects around us are always talking to us in both explicit and implicit ways. There’s the obvious directive of a stop sign or a traffic cone, but there’s also the unspoken messaging conveyed via the ATM machine, the alarm clock, and that shiny new iPad. Objects have always been designed with the idea of communicating their use and meaning in mind, and it’s this relationship that MoMA’s Senior Curator of Architecture and Design, Paola Antonelli, seeks to explore in her upcoming exhibition, Talk to Me, slated for summer of 2011.”

Learn more about Talk to Me here.

Sean Kernan talks about creativity and his creative life.

Find more on B&H Events here.

Learn more about Sean Kernan here.

Read my conversation with Sean Kernan here.

Read more than 40 of my conversations with photographers here.

Joyce Tenneson lectures tonight at the Naples Museum of Art for The View Project exhibit on display Dec 18 – March 13.
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The View Project, conceived and organized by Joyce Tenneson, is an exploration of why certain places or photographs that have such a powerful effect on us as individuals. What is it – beyond surface beauty – that makes specific visual moments so indelible in our memory?
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The View Project is about photographs that mirror something in the photographer’s inner life – images that are personal and powerful, yet perhaps not clearly understood, even to the viewer/photographer” – Joyce Tenneson
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Photographs and comments by a wide array of photographers are included – John Paul Caponigro, Sean Kernan, Douglas Kirkland, George Lepp, Jack Resnicki, Rick Sammon, Joyce Tenneson, Jerry Uelsmann, and many more.
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Two of my alumni Kathy Beal and Stephen Starkman are included in the book and exhibit.
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Alumni Kathy Beal and Stephen Starkman are included in Joyce Tenneson’s book and exhibit The View Project.

Photographs and comments by a wide array of  photographers are included – John Paul Caponigro, Sean Kernan, Douglas  Kirkland, George Lepp, Jack Resnicki, Rick Sammon, Joyce Tenneson, Jerry  Uelsmann, and many more.

The View Project, conceived and organized  by Joyce Tenneson, is an exploration of why certain places or  photographs that have such a powerful effect on us as individuals. What  is it – beyond surface beauty – that makes specific visual moments so  indelible in our memory?

“The View Project is about photographs that  mirror something in the  photographer’s inner life – images that are  personal and powerful, yet  perhaps not clearly understood, even to the  viewer/photographer” –  Joyce Tenneson

Learn more about the exhibit/lecture at the Naples Museum of Art here.
Learn more about The View Project here.
Find out more about Joyce Tenneson here.
Learn more about my alumni here.

Black and white printing presents several significant challenges; the ability to produce a neutral color, the ability to maintain that neutral appearance under different light sources (reduced metamerism), the ability to attain graybalance (consistent color throughout the entire tonal scale); the ability to achieve a very dark black (high dmax) without sacrificing shadow detail (low dot gain), and longevity. All of these things are now easily attainable.

Black and white inkjet printing has come of age. In past years, there have been many compelling solutions for making black and white prints with inkjet technology; some have been fraught with problems (third party quadtone ink sets clog easily) and others have been expensive (ColorByte’s ImagePrint RIP). Today, superior quality inkjet printing is both affordable and easily achieved.

Epson has addressed these issues by reformulating their inkset to include not one, not two, but three black inks. You now have a choice of using either Matte Black ink or Photo Black ink with Light Black ink and Light Light Black ink. These inks are used with the other color inks (Cyan, Light Cyan, Magenta, Light Magenta, and Yellow) for a total of eight inks.

Manufacturer’s have reformulated their inksets, adding multiple black inks to highly saturated color inks. To produce the best black and white prints, you want to use all the inks because printing with Black ink only produces a visible dot structure and a lighter black.

Manufacturers have also introduced their own software solutions to separate digital files differently, using more black ink and less color ink. Using more black ink to make a print does several things. It makes it easier to achieve a truly neutral color; it uses more neutral ink and less highly saturated ink. It makes it easier to achieve graybalance (consistent hue throughout the entire tonal scale); graybalance has also been improved by advances in software in both the driver and with improved profiles. It increases the density of the black; dmax ratings for Epson’s UltraChrome II inkset on glossy papers (3.65) now exceeds the dmax of silver gelatin prints (3.2). It reduces metamerism; black ink is the least metameric ink and using a Light Light Black ink makes it possible to carry very subtle highlight detail with gray instead of yellow, the most metameric and fugitive ink. It increases longevity (up to 326 years before visible fading depending on paper type and inkiest); black ink is the least light sensitive so using more of it makes prints last longer.

Epson offers an Advanced B&W Photo feature in their driver software. While you can make a black and white print using either the Epson route or the Photoshop route, for the best graybalance, dmax, and longevity, choose the Epson route and the Advanced B&W Photo feature.

Take these steps.

1    Choose Print. Select Printer Manages Color. Click Print Settings.
2    Under Printer select the printer of your choice.
3    Change Copies & Pages to Print Settings. Select the appropriate or nearest Media Type. Select Advanced B&W Photo under Color. Check Advanced. Choose the highest printer resolution available under Print Quality.
4    Change Print Settings to Color Management and under Tone choose Dark. Optionally, use the color wheel to tint the image.

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