“Discover new features and enhancements in Lightroom CC including faster performance, improved local adjustment tools, HTML 5 compatible web galleries, and more!”

View more Lightroom videos here.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops here.

“Learn how easy it is to stitch together multiple files into a panorama that has all of the editing flexibility of a raw file in Lightroom CC.”

It’s one of the best new features in Lightroom CC!

View more Lightroom videos here.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops here.

“Discover how to combine bracketed exposures into a High Dynamic Range image that has all of the editing flexibility of a raw file.”

It’s one of the best new features in Lightroom CC!

View more Lightroom videos here.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops here.

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Want to learn about the new Lightroom CC / Lightroom 6?

Learn from the experts!

Seth Resnick and Jamie Spritzer (D-65), long-time industry leaders in digital imaging workflow, detail all the new features in their new ebook.

It’s free!

Download your free copy here.

Adobe Evangelist Julianne Kost shows you how to automatically tag images with faces using Lightroom CC’s new Facial Recognition feature.

View more Lightroom videos here.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

Adobe Evangelist Julianne Kost creates a Panorama using the brand new tools in Adobe Camera Raw 9.

View more Lightroom videos here.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

Adobe Evangelist Julianne Kost creates a high-dynamic range (HDR) image using the brand new tools in Adobe Camera Raw 9.

View more Lightroom videos here.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

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Adobe recently released Lightroom CC / 6.

Here’s a roundup of the current resources to help get you up to speed.

Check this post later as it will be updated as new resources become available.

1 – Find out about today’s new release at Adobe.

2 - Adobe’s Lightroom CC / Camera Raw 9 FAQ

3 – Adobe releases Camera Raw 9.

4 - Adobe’s Julianne Kost demos new Pano / HDR merges.

5 - Adobe’s Julianne Kost share tips and gems in LR CC.

6 – Kelby One’s free Lightroom CC Learning Center.

7 - Kelby One offers 15 new Lightroom online courses.

8 - Lynda.com offers Jan Kabili’s Running with LR 6.

9 - Derek Story’s free ebook – Pano & HDR in LRCC.

10 - Craft & Vision’s ebook LR 6 Up To Speed.

11 - Scott Kelby’s Lightroom CC book.

12 – David Marx’s Installation / Upgrade Videos

      http://bit.ly/1E4zZDe
      http://bit.ly/1E4Ac9A
      http://bit.ly/1GiElVE
13 – Victoria Bampton’s LR CC Feature Roundup.
Check this post later for updates as new resources become available.

Check out my Advanced Lightroom & Photoshop Workshop with Seth Resnick.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

Resonance in Blue and Gold IA

Originally designed for color grading film and video, Photoshop’s Color Lookup feature offers novel ways to adjust color that will quickly reveal new possibilities in your images. Capable of performing extremely complex calculations extraordinarily efficiently, color lookup tables (LUTs) work by looking up a source color in a table and using the replacement color specified in the grid to transform it for the final destination.

Like Match Color and Gradient Map adjustments (See my last two articles for Digital Photo Pro.) the color effects Color Lookup generates are so complex they are not easy to previsualize. Like anything new, this takes practice. And these are new! Experiment and you’ll find many rich possibilities. Unlike Match Color, Color Lookup is loaded with presets that will allow you to quickly explore many different effects, ones that are far more sophisticated than Gradient Map presets. In this way, using them can be as easy as using many smartphone app effects.

You can also generate your own Color Lookup presets. To do this create a color effect you like with any with any combination of adjustments layers, Opacity and Fill, Blend If sliders, blend modes. (Layer masking and transparency will not be included, because alpha channel information in alpha channels is not included in the recipe.) Then go to File: Export: Color Lookup Table, name the file, and click OK. (I recommend the titles you give your presets include the color space you created them in.) These files are stored in Photoshop’s Presets folder or if they’re saved as ICC profiles in your operating systems Profiles folder. You can now use your custom preset at any time on almost any file by making a Color Lookup adjustment layer and choosing your preset. You can share your custom Color Lookups with others by giving them these exported files. Color LUTs created in Photoshop can even be used in other programs such as After Effects, Premiere, SpeedGrade and other applications that use color LUTs.

Using Photoshop’s Color Lookup you can choose to create color effects as subtle or dramatic as you like. This game-changing color adjustment tool may seem exotic at first because it offers a new way of thinking about and seeing in color. Once you become more familiar with this mindset you’ll truly begin to see with new eyes. Isn’t that what it’s all about?

Read more on Digital Photo Pro.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

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Whether used subtly or dramatically, Photoshop’s Gradient Map color adjustment tool can open up new ways of seeing and working with color for any artist. Photoshop’s Gradient Map assigns new colors to existing brightness values. With it, you can enhance existing colors, transfer colors from one image to another or create entirely new color relationships. It can be wild!

The Gradient Map interface looks difficult to use, but with a few pointers, you’ll find it surprisingly easy to use. While you can apply a Gradient Map directly to a layer (Images > Adjustments > Gradient Map), I recommend you apply Gradient Maps as adjustment layers (Layer > New Adjustment Layer > Gradient Map) to take advantage of both the greater flexibility and control you’ll gain over the final effect.

Once activated, there are a number of default presets you can experiment with, but it’s most likely that you’ll want to create your own. Simply click on an existing gradient in the Properties panel to activate the Gradient Editor. Click New. Click at the bottom of the gradient to add new colors. A pointer will appear; double-click it or the Color box to choose a color. You can move the pointer to direct the color into different tonal values. (Move left to target darker values and right to target lighter values. Alternately, enter a new number in the Location field.) The diamonds left and right of it will control how each color fades into surrounding colors. You can add dozens of different pointers/colors, but for most applications, I recommend you restrain yourself to as few as possible. You can delete a pointer/color by clicking on it and clicking Delete or by pressing the Delete key. When you create an effect you’d like to use more than once, type a Name and click Save; you can easily store, retrieve and share these GRD files.

The color effects you can generate with the Gradient Map are so powerful and so varied, you simply must spend a little time experimenting with it to truly understand both how far you can go and how subtle you can get. Consider this kind of visual research time well spent.

After you’re done experimenting, then it’s time to deliver. Working with the Gradient Map often takes a little finessing. You’re likely to be a little disappointed if you try and get the perfect colors with the Gradient Map alone. You can spend a great deal of time picking and re-picking colors until you get it just right. Instead, try working more broadly, getting close to a desired effect and then fine-tuning the results.

Read details on how to do this on Digital Photo Pro.

Once you’ve mastered the interface, the real challenge begins—visualizing color possibilities. Previsualization can only go so far; instead, use software as a tool for visualization. Instead of rushing to a single finished result, I prefer to work on multiple copies of an image to make side-by-side comparisons of a set of variations. The possibilities are seemingly so limitless that you must perform experiments to find the best solution. If your experiments are both targeted and iterative, you’ll generate many solutions that are more likely to be optimum.

Here, a little color theory can be useful. Use dark colors in shadows and light colors in highlights; otherwise, you may posterize or solarize. Use analogous colors (similar color families) to create transitions; transitions between complementary colors tend to get muddy. Variations on earth tones work well for both realistic and antique effects. Variations on warm colors can add intensity, even fire. Variations on cool colors can generate nocturnal and even aquatic effects.

Photoshop’s Gradient Map is an exotic color adjustment tool that can be a real game changer. If you truly understand the possibilities this tool opens up, you’ll have learned to see in new ways. What could be more valuable?

Read more at Digital Photo Pro.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.


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