LensWorkGrasso

Alumni Jerry Grasso’s photographs are featured in the current issue of LensWork magazine. It’s a dream come true for him. Congratulations Jerry!

“One of my “bucket list” items was to be published in what I consider to be one of the most prestigious magazines dedicated to the promotion of fine art photography in the world today: LensWork Magazine. I have been a subscriber since 2004. In fact, I credit the podcasts of editor Brooks Jensen as one of the early influences on my artistic training. There are so many great, brief articles related to photography; more than enough food for thought.

I am humbled and honored to say that my series, “Moorish Influences”, has been accepted and will appear in the December issue #115 of LensWork. My interview and images will also appear on the Extended Edition dvd. And, one of my images even made the cover of the issue!

This series is an exploration of the progression of the impact the Moors had on Spanish architecture from 711AD to 1492AD. This impact can best be described as ordered repletions, radiating structures, and rhythmic metric patterns. These designs captured in my work are based in spirituality. The Islamic view of the world in general emphasizes and symbolizes the infinite nature of the one God. For them, there was an infinite pattern of forms that extend beyond the world and symbolizes the infinite essence of God.

I would like to thank John Paul for his training, guidance and support over the years. Also, I would like to thank my fellow Next Steppers for their encouragement and artistic suggestions that have helped me solidify my goals and techniques.

My dedicated perseverance and determination continues to sustain my passion and my vision. I look forward to my continued growth as I explore new projects and experiment with new visions. And thanks for indulging me in my moment of success!”

Order your copy here.

View Jerry’s statement here.

Find out more about Jerry Grasso here.

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Louisa Paez Michelin’s new exhibit opens tonight Thursday, Dec 18 from 6-8pm in Boca Raton, Florida.

Congratulations!

Find out more about Louisa Paez Michelin here.

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 How was this effect created? See the illustrations below.

Little explored and capable of opening up whole new frontiers in color adjustment, Photoshop’s Match Color is a tool every user should be aware of, even if it’s only to know what’s possible.

There are three primary reasons to consider using Match Color.

1  - Match two colors exactly.  

(Match the color of one object to another.)

2  - Remove strong color casts.    

(It’s great for neutralizing underwater casts.)

3  - Creatively apply the color in one image to another.

(This will blow your mind!)

A few tips will help you make the most of this fascinating tool …

Read the rest of this post on Digital Photo Pro.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

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Original

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 New colors

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Tool used

PHOTOGRAPH Issue 10

December 16, 2014 | Leave a Comment |

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Issue 10 of PHOTOGRAPH magazine is out and 20% off today.

“Portfolios and interviews feature the work of cover girl Brooke Shaden, whose self-portraits exude a brooding melancholy in a light and whimsical way; the incredible Susan Burnstine, who modifies all of her cameras to best tell the stories of her dreams and nightmares; the portraits of Clive Charlton, who discusses how his art is influenced by his admiration of the Dutch masters for their use of Chiaroscuro; and Jim Kasson’s Staccato series, borne of the idea to make a short set of exposures at night and reassemble them in Photoshop, resulting in a painterly effect of complex lighting patterns, a sense of place, and compelling gestures.

Regular contributors John Paul Caponigro, Michael Frye, Guy Tal, Chris Orwig, Martin Bailey, Piet Van den Eynde, Adam Blasberg and David duChemin open up about patience, flow, creativity, finding rhythm, the beauty of natural light in both landscapes and portraits, the meaning of success, and the magic of the lens.”

Flow is this issues topic in my Creative Composition column.

Find out more here.

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A unique Father/Son Print edition featuring two images

Place your order here.

Offer ends Monday 12/15 at 5 pm PST.

It makes a great Christmas gift!

Prints have already started shipping!

Plus get a free Two Generations ebook with every print.

$495

$44.95 shipping domestic – FedEx
$79.95 shipping international
 - USPS

For the second time ever, my father and I are offering a unique print edition featuring two images – one of his and one of mine. My father selected the pair. Both images display our shared love of stone.
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I made the print with his supervision. Printed at a 17″x22″ sheet size on rag paper with archival pigmented ink, it’s annotated and signed by both artists.
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Our open edition print prices normally start at $2,000 and $5,000. This edition is special – it’s limited to the number of prints sold for five days only. And it’s specially priced. Our prints will never be more affordable. And this edition will never be available again.
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One of these prints is going into the Smithsonian’s permanent collection!
John Paul Caponigro - Norcia, Italy, 2013

Paul Caponigro - Nahant, MA, 1965

Paper size – 17”x22”
Image size left – 9.7”x7.25”
Image size right – 8.75”x7.25”

Epson Velvet Fine Art Paper
Epson Ultrachrome K3 with Vivid Magenta
Signed en recto by both artists in pencil.
Numbered and annotated en verso.
Limited to the number of prints sold for five days only.

Place your order here.

Offer ends Monday 12/15 at 5 pm PST.

It makes a great Christmas gift!

Prints have already started shipping!

2Gen_Print2015_425

A unique Father/Son Print edition featuring two images

Place your order here.

Offer ends Monday 12/15 at 5 pm EST.

It makes a great Christmas gift!

Plus get a free Two Generations ebook with every print.

$495

$44.95 shipping domestic – FedEx
$79.95 shipping international
 - USPS

For the second time ever, my father and I are offering a unique print edition featuring two images – one of his and one of mine. My father selected the pair. Both images display our shared love of stone.
.
I made the print with his supervision. Printed at a 17″x22″ sheet size on rag paper with archival pigmented ink, it’s annotated and signed by both artists.
.
Our open edition print prices normally start at $2,000 and $5,000. This edition is special – it’s limited to the number of prints sold for five days only. And it’s specially priced. Our prints will never be more affordable. And this edition will never be available again.
.
John Paul Caponigro - Norcia, Italy, 2013

Paul Caponigro - Nahant, MA, 1965

Paper size – 17”x22”
Image size left – 9.7”x7.25”
Image size right – 8.75”x7.25”

Epson Velvet Fine Art Paper
Epson Ultrachrome K3 with Vivid Magenta
Signed en recto by both artists in pencil.
Numbered and annotated en verso.
Limited to the number of prints sold for five days only.

Place your order here.

Offer ends Monday 12/15 at 5 pm EST.

It makes a great Christmas gift!

enewsignup_2013

Get my enews Insights tomorrow free.

The next issue features a specially priced Father/Son Print edition available for 5 days only.

Plus discover events, ebooks, galleries, quotes and much more.

Sign up for Insights here.

Maisel_LGCbook

You might be tempted to think less of this book because it’s not hard cover, because the reproduction is fine but not stellar, because of the typography is extraordinarily average, or because despite that fact that the title is the stock phrase Jay that is most known for and the selection of images is not definitive.  But you’d be missing the point. Light Gesture & Color is one of Jay Maisel’s best books.

Light Gesture & Color is like having an intimate conversation with a master photographer about his enduring passion. Short and sweet. Direct. Pithy. That’s how Jay Maisel serves up a lifetime of hard-earned wisdom. Most of the pages with text have half a dozen lines. One has two – and it’s enough. Better still, each page builds on the other.

You could read this book in a single sitting. I did. I recommend the experience. But I also recommend you read it again – and again. Mark the pages you want to return to for in a few simple lines there are life lessons to be found and refound. It is not that you have to think long and hard to figure out what he’s saying; Jay’s already done that work for you. It is that you’ll need more time to truly internalize what he has found and shared, until it is deeply felt; he did. Do this and you will be a better photographer. You’ll learn to see more. What could be more important?

Find Light Gesture & Color here.

Find out more about Jay Maisel here.

Read 20 Questions with Jay Maisel here.

Read a collection of quotes by Jay Maisel here.

Read Jay’s favorite quotes here.

Here’s an example of Jay at his best.

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Quotes_Callahan

Here’s a collection of my favorite photographs by photographer Harry Callahan.

“I think I came alive when I started photography.” – Harry Callahan

“To be a photographer, one must photograph. No amount of book learning, no checklist of seminars attended, can substitute for the simple act of making pictures.” – Harry Callahan

“You only do exercises in art school. That’s not the real thing. A little bit tells you so much. You have to find your own self. And you don’t know what you are! But that’s what you have to search for.” – Harry Callahan

“Every time I talked about making a picture I didn’t do it. I had already done it – talking about it! I quit talking.” – Harry Callahan

“I photograph continuously, often without a good idea or strong feelings. During this time the photos are nearly all poor but I believe they develop my seeing and help later on in other photos.” – Harry Callahan

“I guess I’ve shot about 40,000 negatives and of these I have about 800 pictures I like.” – Harry Callahan

“In terms of art, the only real answer that I know of is to do it. If you don’t do it, you don’t know what might happen.” – Harry Callahan

“Experience is the best teacher of all. And for that, there are no guarantees that one will become an artist. Only the journey matters …” – Harry Callahan

“It’s the subject matter that counts. I’m interested in revealing the subject in a new way to intensify it. A photo is able to capture a moment that people can’t always see.” – Harry Callahan

“Photography is an adventure just as life is an adventure.” – Harry Callahan

“I wish more people felt that photography was an adventure the same as life itself and felt that their individual feelings were worth expressing. To me, that makes photography more exciting.” – Harry Callahan

“If man wishes to express himself photographically, he must understand, surely to a certain extent, his relationship to life. I am interested in relating the problems that affect me to some set of values that I am trying to discover and establish as being my life. I want to discover and establish them through photography. This is strictly my affair and does not explain these pictures by any means. Anyone else not having the desire to take them would realize that I must have felt this was purely personal. This reason, whether it be good or bad, is the only reason I can give for these photographs.” – Harry Callahan

“The photographs that excite me are photographs that say something in a new manner; not for the sake of being different, but ones that are different because the individual is different and the individual expresses himself.” – Harry Callahan

“I realize that we all do express ourselves, but those who express that which is always being done are those whose thinking is almost in every way in accord with everyone else. Expression on this basis has become dull to those who wish to think for themselves.” – Harry Callahan

“The mystery isn’t in the technique, it’s in each of us.” – Harry Callahan

“I can tell you for me it goes on forever. There are some things you can’t ever find out. You can’t find out in one life either.” – Harry Callahan

“I think nearly every artist continually wants to reach the edge of nothingness – the point where you can’t go any further.” – Harry Callahan

“I can’t say what makes a picture. I can’t say. It’s mysterious.” – Harry Callahan

“A picture is like a prayer.” – Harry Callahan

“I do believe strongly in photography and hope by following it intuitively that when the photographs are looked at they will touch the spirit in people.” – Harry Callahan

“I like the simple things. I don’t know why. I’m that way. I came from a simple place.” – Harry Callahan

Read my conversation with photographer Harry Callahan here.

 Find more quotes in The Essential List Of Photographers Quotes.

DesktopCalendar2009My free December 2014 Desktop Calendar features a new image from Jokulsarlon, Iceland.

Download it here. 


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