Epson’s new Legacy Papers are the finest papers I’ve ever used.

Find out more about Epson Legacy Papers here.

Hear what other photographers are saying about them.

Use them in my digital printing workshops.

2Books

Two books have profoundly influenced my thinking about man’s relationships with nature.

Jamake Highwater’s The Primal Mind is the best explanation of Native American viewpoints on the deep interconnectivity between humans and land, as well as art, that I’ve ever read.

Here’s an excerpt …

“Art is a way of seeing, and what we see in art helps to define what we understand by the word “reality.” We do not all see the same things. Though the dominant societies usually presume that their vision represents the sole truth about the world, each society (and often individuals with the same society) sees reality uniquely. The complex process by which the arts transforms the act of seeing into a vision of the world is one of the the consummate mysteries of the arts – one of the reasons that art is inseparable from religion and philosophy for most tribal peoples.”

Find The Primal Mind here.

David Abrams The Spell Of The Sensuous is a poetic rumination on the important role language plays in forming identity and relationships – and he suggests the English language lacks key concepts.

Here’s an excerpt …

“Ecologically considered, it is not primarily our verbal statements that are “true” or “false,” but rather the kind of relationsh that we sustain with the rest of nature. A human community that lives in a mutually beneficial relation with the surrounding earth is a community, we might say, that lives in truth.”

Find The Spell Of The Sensuous here.

Listen to me read two of my favorite passages from these books here.

Find more Recommended Reading here.

(For more reading in this vein click on Important Thoughts.)

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New images from my annual exhibit New Work are out!

Get 25% off all prints today. Use the code ANNUALEXHIBIT2016.

View new Works here.

Take the online interactive 360 gallery tour here.

(Click on the images.)

Get the ebook here.

Find related Studies here.

Read more about the making of these new works here.

View my gallery talks this past weekend on Facebook Live.

Email jpc@johnpaulcaponigro.com or call 207-354-0578.

In this video …

I describe what motivates me to make my images.

I celebrate the power of prints.

And I discuss why I choose to print with Epson printers, inks, and papers.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

Find out more about Epson’s new Legacy papers here.

Revelation Study 1

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We played a fun game during my recent exhibit.

People wrote down their associations after looking at inkblots.

One lucky player won a free ebook!

We’re doing this online now.

Write down your associations for each of these images in this post’s comments; include the numbers.

You could be the next lucky winner to get a free ebook!

View more Studies here.

View related finished works here.

Revelation Study 2

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Revelation Study 4

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Revelation Study 11

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Revelation Study 16

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Revelation Study 19

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Find the ebook here.

Find the catalog here.

Revelation gathers images inspired by encounters with the arts of “primitive” or “primal” cultures. This ebook collects photographs from both polar regions – Greenland and Antarctica.

Excerpt from the accompanying essay …

“My work is not a simple document of my encounters with the varied spirit(s) of nature; it is a collaboration with it. An important aspect of this work is bringing into focus not just what is seen with the naked eye but what is experienced by the whole being – body, mind, and emotion. The process of creating these images is like dreaming while I’m awake. Some of these visions were discovered in dreams, some in waking reveries, some in conscious visualizations, and some were discovered directly through the process of making images. Whether the images arise in the moment or long after the moment has passed, the essential experience is extended, like a seed that once planted germinates, blooms, and bears fruit. Regardless of where I’m creating – on site, in transit, or in studio –  the places that have touched me deeply are always with me.”

View / Read more here.

View more images here.

Budh

Secret Flower

Spirit of the Squash Blossom

Censered

Enchambered

Jonahs Apprehension

This is a selection of the images that started my series Revelation over twenty years ago. I had been planning on making related images in the arctic and antarctic for more than ten years. The series Revelation was on my mind when I first went to Antarctica in 2005; I started shooting deliberately for it on a return voyage in 2007; material slowly accumulated in subsequent voyages in 2009, 2011, 2013, and 2015; and then in 2016 it all came together. Part of the reason this work waited so long is that there was other work to do, including the completion of other related bodies of work including Inhalation and Exhalation. Doing that work influenced this work.

The images I recently released (arctic and antarctic Revelations) have a different quality as a result of waiting. they would have been different if I finished them earlier. In part, this comes from sleeping on it; the subconscious does a lot of work. In part, this is is the result of a significant amount of conscious thought; studying craft and composition were only the beginnings, digging into my thoughts and feelings about the subject and the approach were the real keys; related reading and viewing supported it. In part, this is the result of my inner state now; contrary to what some have suggested, I’ve found this isn’t something to overcome no matter what the current conditions but rather something to be nurtured and cultivated. While one needs to guard agains procrastination, one also needs to guard against rushing through content and not developing the necessary depth to fully engage it, fostering an intimate relationship with it. Doing the work develops depth.  And, the work doesn’t just happen behind the lens or in front of the computer.

So when should you make work? This is a question that is best approached with awareness and deep contemplation. Though there are repeatable patterns and common tendencies, there is no one definitive answer to this question for all artists and all situations. I’ve found some work gets produced very quickly, sometimes a whole series is made in one shoot, and some work gets produced very slowly, over decades. Ultimately, I think you have to go with your gut. That doesn’t rule out the possibility and potential benefits of a great deal of research and forethought before you do. The two working in concert together often yield the most powerful combination. However, the single most important ingredient is, not mere spontaneity, which can be short lived, but an effervescence of spirit, and it’s particularly important to pay attention to this quality if it can be sustained over longer periods of time. One needs to be alive to the work to make it a living thing.

In the era of social networks, there is a tremendous pressure to release work quickly and to keep releasing work on a regular basis.  This can create a pace that is unsustainable for most creatives, at least when it comes to releasing work with real depth. Good fully developed work takes time … because developing a relationship with your work and your self takes time, much like creating deeper relationships with people take time. Savor it.

At the same time, the unfinished work we make along the way has it’s own value, a very different value, and it can be fascinating to watch how we get to our final destinations. It’s important to know the difference and make the distinction between fully developed images and unfinished images, between work and play, both when we are producing our own images and enjoying others.

View new images in my series Revelation here.

View more images in the series Revelation here.

View the 360 degree interactive exhibit here.

View related Studies here.

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Revelation XLIII

Digital technology offers interesting new possibilities for print editions.

The appearance of the print may change.

It has long been an accepted practice that artists will change the rendition of their images over time.

Ansel Adams famously remarked,  “The negative is comparable to the composer’s score and the print to its performance. Each performance differs in subtle ways.” You can view the changes in Ansel Adams’ classic Moonrise Over Hernandez here. Some collectors search for the optimum print made in an artist’s lifetime, while others collect multiple prints to create a meaningful comparison.

The composition may change.

Similarly, it’s been accepted that a composition may vary if cropping is adjusted during printing, though typically this is a matter of fine tuning rather than dramatic change. Today, with composites, the composition may change by replacing components, often dramatically changing the composition.

I’ve released composited images and later changed the composition substantially.

In the following to image, Voyage Of Grace, the feather at the top of the waterfall was at the bottom of the waterfall in the first print sold. I chose not to start the edition again because it was not a substantially different statement. The one collector who has that print has a unique item with exceptional value. (I do offer print replacements for a fee, which the collector has not chosen to exercise.)

Voyage of Grace

Find out more about this and related images here.

Updated Or New Edition ?

For me, the question of whether to replace one edition with another or to issue a new edition is an interesting one. It’s one that my father – a traditional analog photographer – and most photographers of his generation do not have to address. New possibilities bring new challenges.

There are times when related but distinctly different images warrant a new edition.

The following two images are made from separate single exposures of the same subject made at approximately the same time, but their compositions and intent are quite different; one is straight and representational, the other is composited and surreal.

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The straight image

View the straight series here.

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The composite

View the composited series here.

The two editions both complement and contrast with one another in ways that build value in each edition. In general, when you can align the interests of the artistic statement with the interests of the market, you’ve got a winning combination.

Find out more about my print editions here.

Sign up for my newsletter Collectors Alert here.

Download my free PDF on Editions here.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

Revelation XLII

Revelation XLIV

Revelation XXV

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Revelation XXVI

Revelation XXVIII

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Revelation XXXVIII

New images from my series Revelation are out!

Find more here.

View the ebook here.

Get the catalog here.

See related studies here.

Find out about the making of the exhibit here.

Hear my gallery talks on Facebook Live.

Antarctica CXCV

Antarctica CXCI

Antarctica CXC

Antarctica CXCII

Antarctica CXCIII

Antarctica CXCIV

Antarctica CXCVIII

Antarctica CXCVI

Antarctica CXCVII

During our 2016 DPD Antarctica Workshop we had beautiful weather – foggy mornings, sunny days, and calm waters. I’d been looking for clear reflections like these for years; it is the windiest continent. All of the eight voyages I’ve made to Antarctica have been defined by weather, which has never been the same twice.

View more images here.

Find out about my exhibit New Work 2016 here.

Preview my ebook Antarctica here.

Get a free ebook Antarctica Two Visions here.

Find out about our 2018 DPD Antarctica workshop here!


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