.

How To Combine Focussed & Defocussed Images Using Photoshop

In & Out-Of-Focus Mixed

 

Combining in and out-of-focus images with Photoshop is a simple matter of placing tow versions of the same image on separate layers.

If you’re simulating an out-of-focus image using blur filters in Photoshop this takes one step. Use the Layers menu and select Duplicate Layer or in the Layers palette drag the layer to the Create a new layer icon ( + ). The two layers will be perfectly registered. The top layer is ready for blurring.

If you’re combing separate exposures of the same image that are in and out-of-focus add a couple more easy steps.


Insights Members can login to read the full article.
Email:
or Sign up

Enjoy Sandra Chandler’s New Project Salt – Website, Book, Exhibits

SALT

Pushdot Gallery, Portland, OR

February 4th – March 31st, 2022

Artist Reception: TBD

www.salt.photography

www.sandrachandler.com

Instagram

Sandra Marill Chandler’s new body of work juggles abstraction and realism.  Her aerial interpretation of unexpected color patterns is based upon the salt evaporation basins of the San Francisco South Bay. It illustrates the brilliant hued pockets and tactile textures that are ever-changing.

Chandler grew up in San Francisco traveling frequently via the San Francisco International Airport. “I have always been captivated by the South Bay salt pond’s vibrant colors, captivating textural shapes and intriguing graphics as seen from airplane windows.  As I have grown as a photographer, I have become attracted to aerial landscape photography and have come to appreciate a fresh perspective of our earth.”

“I strive to make photographs balanced between abstraction and realism aspiring to create colorful explosive images with noteworthy details. These photographic moments prompt a sense of space, a moment of drama and new ways of perception – for us all.”

Read More

A Grand Overview Of Photoshop’s Blur Filters

Photoshop Blur Filters

There are many reasons to explore blur in your images; remove distractions, direct attention, enhance space, modify mood, and add interesting visual artifacts are six among many. Blur can be controlled at the point of capture and in post-processing. Thoroughly understanding your post-processing options will help you make choices about when and how to control blur in your images before, during, and after exposure.

When it comes to post-processing blur, you’ve got options! Photoshop currently offers fourteen filters; Field Blur, Iris Blur, Tilt-Shift, Average, Blur, Blur More, Box Blur, Gaussian Blur, Lens Blur, Motion Blur, Radial Blur, Shape Blur, Smart Blur, Surface Blur - in order of appearance in the Filter: Blur drop-down menu.

At first glance, the list is overwhelming. Where do you start? Get started with this quick survey of available options.


Insights Members can login to read the full article.
Email:
or Sign up

Three Free Ways To Enjoy My Content

Sign up for First Looks here.
Weekly

First Looks emails let you know about new blog posts as soon as they are made.
(If you have already been receiving similar emails sign up here too as those will end soon due to a software discontinuation.)

Sign up for Insights here.
Monthly

Insights excerpts only specific highlights from my blog and offers additional educational content.
Blog posts that are password protected are only available to Insights members.

Sign up for Collectors Alert here.
Quarterly

Collector Alerts only shares content about my images – new Images, Catalogs, Videos, Viewing Rooms, Talks, Exhibits and more.

Fast & Easy Ways To Blur Image Backgrounds in Photoshop

.
“In this easy-to-follow tutorial, you will learn how to blur backgrounds in Photoshop! You will learn about selections, Layer Masks, Content-Aware Fill, Smart Objects, and the Depth Blur Neural Filter to blur your photo’s background. This Photoshop tutorial will cover everything you need to know about creating a shallow depth of field effect.”
.

How To Create Sophisticated Motion Effects With Photoshop’s Path Blur

Photoshop CC’s recent addition to its Blur Gallery, Path Blur offers a creative and flexible way to add directional motion to your images in post-production. It’s astonishing! You’ve got to try it to believe it – and to truly understand it.

The Blur Gallery now has five effects (Field Blur, Iris Blur, Tilt-Shift, Path Blur, and Spin Blur) that can be controlled from a single panel. Once you’ve accessed one, you can quickly access the others at the same time enabling you to create complex blur effects in a single stop. Path Blur alone is capable of delivering lots of complex motion effects with one simple path.

Before applying Path Blur, consider using a Smart Object to make the filter non-destructive, re-editable, and maskable. (I recommend you acquire Raw files as a Smart Objects but in cases where you can’t, such as cases that involve merges or stacks or major retouching, convert your Background layer to a Smart Object – Layer: Smart Objects: Convert To Smart Object.)

To apply the filter follow this path - Filter: Blur Gallery : Path Blur. The Blur Gallery panel will appear, offering you five extraordinary sliders and multiple points of control.


Insights Members can login to read the full article.
Email:
or Sign up

How To Control Blur FX In Photoshop With Amazing Precision

Photographers use blur (or bokeh) for a variety of reasons: to enhance space through depth of field; to add interesting visual artifacts; to simplify them; to change the quality of their expression. In the past, blur was controlled almost entirely through exposure; now it can also be controlled during post-processing, giving photographers an unprecedented array of options and ways to customize the look and feel of their images. Knowing what you can do, how far you can go, and when you can do it may change the way you shoot, one time, sometimes, or all the time.

There are many blur filters in Photoshop; Field Blur, Iris Blur, Tilt-Shift, Gaussian Blur, Lens Blur, Motion Blur, Radial Blur, Shape Blur, Smart Blur, Surface Blur, in order of appearance in the Filter: Blur drop-down menu. (See A Quick Visual Comparison Of Photoshop's Blur Filters here.) The choices are extensive and it pays to familiarize yourself with your options by experimenting with them; you’ll find you have an extraordinary set of options that you can modify and combine creatively. If you only use the filters Gaussian Blur and Lens Blur, you’ll still have game-changing control at your fingertips, once you learn how to extend and modify them.

Photoshop's Lens Blur filter

There are several important non-destructive strategies you can use to gain more control over all filter effects that will enable you to go further in your explorations and generate more sophisticated and compelling results. Try one or all of the moves in this classic progression. Apply a filter to a duplicate layer and then modify its Opacity, Blend Mode, Blend If Sliders, and add a layer mask.


Insights Members can login to read the full article.
Email:
or Sign up

How To Discover & Develop Your Visual Voice – A Talk With Photographer Matt Payne

Recently, I had a great conversation with Matt Payne (FStop & Collaborate).

We talked about …

  • My journey into photography and how I differentiated myself as an artist,
  • The difference between what art “is” and what it “is about,”
  • Discovering the extraordinary in the ordinary through photography,
  • Finding our voice as artists (and is that even a thing?),
  • And a lot more!

In bonus content, we discuss studying creativity, ways to do it, and how it has helped me as an artist.

Listen to the bonus content on Patreon.

Find more of Matt Payne’s great content here.

A Quick Visual Comparison Of All Of Photoshop’s Blur Filters

A_1_BlurFiltersBefore

Before Blur FX

B_15_Tilt-ShiftBlur_full

After Blur FX

There are many reasons to explore blur in your images: remove distractions, direct attention, enhance space, modify mood and add interesting visual artifacts are a few among many. Blur can be controlled at the point of capture and in post-processing. Thoroughly understanding your post-processing options will help you make choices about when and how to control blur in your images before, during and after exposure.

When it comes to post-processing blur, you’ve got options! Photoshop currently offers 14 filters: Field Blur, Iris Blur, Tilt-Shift, Average, Blur, Blur More, Box Blur, Gaussian Blur, Lens Blur, Motion Blur, Radial Blur, Shape Blur, Smart Blur, Surface Blur – in order of appearance in the Filter > Blur drop-down menu. (If you want to extend your software palette even further, explore onOne Software’s FocalPoint.)

At first glance, the list is overwhelming. Where do you start? Get started with this quick visual survey of available options.

Read More

2021 In Review – The World’s Best Photographs

 

Enjoy viewing 2021’s top photography collections!

 

History

Al Jazeera

AP News

Atlantic

Atlantic Top 25

BBC

BBC Sports

Bloomberg

CNN

CNN Historic

CNN Drone

The Guardian

National Geographic

National Geographic 10 Memorable

National Geographic – Travel

New York Times

New Yorker

Reuters

TIME’s Top 100

Time Top 10

Time

Washington Post

Washington Post The Year Of Endurance

World Press

 

Nature

NANPA Nature

Audubon

CNN Wildlife

CNN Comedy Wildlife

The Guardian Wildlife

The Guardian Ocean

National Geographic – Animals

National Geographic – Science

Nature Best Science

Atlantic Close-up

Reuters – Animals

Reuters – Environment

CNN Environment

 

View My Best Images Of 2021.