PHOTOGRAPH – Issue 2

February 12, 2013 | Leave a Comment |

There’s lots of inspiration in Issue 2 of PHOTOGRAPH magazine, which includes featured portfolios and interviews with Martin Bailey, Andy Biggs, and Chris Orwig, as well as articles from David duChemin, Nicole S. Young, John Paul Caponigro, Martin Bailey, Al Smith, Jay Goodrich, Piet Van den Eynde, Younes Bounhar, Kevin Clark, and Chris Orwig.

My Creative Composition article discusses using the frame creatively, perhaps the most essential skill in photography.

Purchase it here – $8 single issue or $24 quarterly subscription.

 

There’s a new electronic magazine in town – and I’m delighted to be a part of it.

The 132 pages in Issue One of PHOTOGRAPH, A Digitial Quarterly Magazine for Creative Photographers. features …

Columns include Martin Bailey’s The Art of the Print, John Paul Caponigro’s Creative Composition, Kevin Clark’s The Studio Sketchbook, David Duchemin’s Without The Camera, Chris Orwig’s Creativity, and Piet van Den Eynde’s Lightroom Before + After.

Portfolios by Art Wolfe, Nate Parker, and Bruce Percy are followed by short interviews.

Featured articles by Younes Bounhar, Andrew Gibson, Jay Goodrich, Al Smith, and Nicole Young.

PHOTOGRAPH is available now through Craft & Vision, as a PDF download, for USD$8. A 4-issue subscription for US$24 (or buy 3 issues and get one free). You can subscribe today, or, if you want to do so risk-free, we’ll send a short email to everyone that buys Issue One and give you the chance to top-up your subscription with the remaining 3 issues for US$16, as long as you do it before the end of November 2012.

Find out more and subscribe on David Duchemin’s blog.

Here’s an excerpt from the first article in my column Creative Composition.

Dynamics Not Rules

“When it comes to composition, there are no rules . . . except, perhaps, never say never and always avoid saying always. I recommend you don’t ask, “Should I . . .?”; rather, ask “What happens when I . . . ?”. But there are principles. Each element has a unique force and contributes to the whole. Each element influences the other, creating a cascading chain of action, reaction, and interaction. These forces are definable and consistent, so you can understand them and apply them repeatedly. An understanding of what these elements are will open up possibilities and create opportunities for you. An understanding of how each element works will help you apply it so that you can improvise given the unique characteristics of a specific situation and your own con- cerns. Versatility with many strategies enables you to be more successful in more varied situations and to make more varied statements. Understanding the principles of visual dynamics will help make your decision making pro- cess more informed, but it won’t make choices for you. Awareness is the key. Better awareness brings better choices. Better choices bring better results …”

The latest issue of View Camera Magazine features my father, Paul Caponigro with a special portfolio of unpublished work from 1959-2009.

64 pages of images with inspiring and insightful text.

“The eminent designer Eleanor Morris Caponigro has established a pace and rhythm here that allows each picture to breathe.  See how each refers to the one before it and sets up the next. A record of an amazing life – an astonishing achievement – climbs to elusive harmonious heights. ” – Michael Moore

Find more at View Camera

Read our father son conversation

Read over 40 conversations with photographers

noise-capture

Noise comes in three types or patterns:
1) Random noise 2) Fixed-pattern noise 3) Banding noise

Noise often has two components—brightness and color:
4) Image noise 5) Luminance noise 6) Chrominance noise

Knowing the type and kind of noise produced will help guide you to solutions to reduce it. There are three types of noise: random noise, fixed-pattern noise and banding noise.

Random noise appears as both luminance (light and dark) and chrominance (hue/saturation) variations not native to an image, but produced by the electrical operation of a capture device. The electrical signal produced in response to photons is commingled with electrical variations in the operation of the capture device. Random noise patterns always change, even if exposure conditions are identical. Random noise is most sensitive to ISO setting. Again, digital cameras have one native ISO setting; higher ISO settings artificially boost the signal produced by the sensor and the noise accompanying it. The results? You get a brighter picture from less light and exaggerated noise. Since the pattern is random, it’s challenging to separate the noise from the image, especially texture, and even the best software used to reduce it through blurring may compromise image sharpness; how much depends on the level of reduction.

Fixed-pattern noise (“hot pixels”) is a consistent pattern specific to an individual sensor. Fixed-pattern noise becomes more pronounced with longer exposures. Higher temperatures also intensify it. Since the pattern is consistent, it easily can be mapped and reduced or eliminated.

Banding noise is introduced when the camera reads the data produced by the sensor; it’s camera-dependent. Banding noise is most visible at high ISOs, in shadows and when an image has been dramatically brightened. This type of noise is obvious and objectionable; the regular row and column patterns from the sensor quickly call attention to the presence of banding noise, and it’s challenging to reduce without severely compromising image sharpness …

Read the rest of the article in the current issue of Digital Photo Pro.

Learn more with my free Lessons.

Learn even more in my Workshops.

Combination

July 20, 2009 | Leave a Comment |

You can create synergy between existing elements in your images and generate something new. How? Takes these steps.

Step one. Identify all the elements in your best images.
Step two. List all the possible combinations.
Step Three. Put what you’ve discovered into words.
Step four. Select the most promising combinations to pursue.
Step five. Generate a lot of variations on a single combination before committing to a final solution.
Step six. Execute.

This is an extreme distillation of my article Combination, now in the current issue of AfterCapture magazine.

Read more in my Creativity ebooks.

Learn more in my workshops.

The latest issue of Fraction, an online photographic magazine features a preview of my new work from Antarctica.
See it here.


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