Best Of Best Photographs 2018

The new year is a wonderful time to look at great photographs!

Dozens of media outlets collect their best of the best.

You’ll find links to the best of the best below.

Enjoy!

Pulitzer Prize Winners In Photography 2018

Time Top 100 Photos Of 2018

NY Times The Year In Pictures 2018

Magnum Pictures of the Year 2018

International Photography Awards 2018

World Press Photo 2018

The Guardian Best Photographs 2018

The Atlantic Top New Photos Of 2018

Reuters Pictures Of The Year 2018

The Atlantic Top 25 News Photos Of 2018

Bloomberg The Year In Pictures 2018

NY Times Best Travel Photographs 2018

CNN Best Travel Photos 2018

National Geographic Best Photos Of 2018

Sony World Photography Awards 2018

Lens Culture’s Favorite Photographs Of 2018

My Modern Met Top Photographs From Around The World 2018

Huff Po iPhone Photography Awards 2018

Drone Awards 2018

Audubon Photography Awards 2018

Nikon Small World Photography Winners 2018

The Guardian’s Astronomy Photographer Of The Year Shortlist 2018

Sports Illustrated’s Best Photos of 2018

Car and Driver’s Hottest Car Photos of 2018

Berify’s 11 Famous Portrait Photographers Of 2018

My Modern MET 20 Best Architecture Photos 2018

Best Photography Books Of 2018 – Part 1

Best Photography Books Of 2018 – Part 2

Sign up for my newsletter Insights for more great content.

Photos_Best_2017

The new year is a wonderful time to look at great photographs!

Dozens of media outlets collect their best of the best.

You’ll find links to the best of those below.

Enjoy!

Time’s Best Photographs Of 2017

New York Times The Year In Photographs 2017

The World Press Photo Contest Winners 2017

CNN’s The World’s Best Travel Photos 2017

Bloomberg’s 100 Best Photographs Of 2017

Reuter’s Pictures Of The Year 2017

Reuter’s Best Business Photographs Of 2017

Visual Culture’s Most Powerful Moments of Journalism 2017

Sports Illustrated’s Best Photos Of 2017

National Geographic’s Best Photographs Of 2017

The Guardian’s Best Of Wildlife Photography Awards 2017

Audubon’s Photography Awards 2017

CBS Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2017

Nature’s Best Science Images Of 2017

Space’s Most Amazing Space Photographs Of 2017

Popular Science’s Best Picture’s Of The Solar Eclipse 2017

The Huffington Post’s Best iPhone Photographs Of 2017

My Modern Met’s Best Photographs Of 2017

Lens Culture’s 75 Experts Name the Top Photo Books of 2017

Sign up for my newsletter Insights for more digests like this.

SepiaTown

Sepia Town lets you view and share thousands of mapped historical images from around the globe.

You can even upload your own vintage images and share your history.

Explore Sepia Town here.

Blend It Out

January 5, 2011 | Leave a Comment |

It’s a perfect shot! If only those unwanted moving objects (UMOs, i.e., a person or a crowd) in the scene would disappear. As long as the unwanted elements in your frame move, even just a little, you can make them disappear from your image by taking two or more shots and using Photoshop’s layering and blending capabilities.

You don’t have to retouch your image. Blending is different than retouching. The unwanted elements aren’t covered over with new information by hiding them with replacement information similar to the surround, either from the same source or another. With blends, the information behind the moving subject is revealed. How? It’s contained in the other shot(s).

You even can do this with exposures that are made with slightly different angles of rotation or framing, so you can use this technique with handheld exposures, not just those made with a tripod. Camera motion may make manual registration difficult, but Photoshop automatically will align and, in some cases, distort the separate exposures so that they register precisely …

Read more at Digital Photo Pro.

Learn more in my digital photography ebooks.

Learn more in my digital photography workshops.

Using Histograms – ETTR

December 27, 2010 | 2 Comments |

Review Histograms After Exposure

One big advantage of shooting digitally is the ability to view a histogram in the LCD screen on the back of your camera body. A histogram is a graph of the relative distribution of the data in your image from shadows on the left to highlights on the right. You can use a histogram to evaluate not only the tonal distribution but also the quality of your exposures. By viewing the histogram immediately after exposure, you can determine if you need to make additional exposures at alternate settings to get better exposures. Simply program your camera to display a histogram immediately after exposure. You'll find this immediate feedback will result in much higher success rates.


Insights Members can login to read the full article.
Email:


Since it's invention, photography has played an important role in history. It not only records history, it also has its own history. America knows itself in part through photographs. So what are the most important American photographs?

Here are the top 25 according to Mastersdegree.net.

What other photographs would you include?


Insights Members can login to read the full article.
Email:

keep looking »

Subscribe

Get the RSS Feed  

Subscribe by Email