The Best Of The Best Photographs Of 2019

Hubble’s Latest Portrait of Saturn

The new year is a wonderful time to look at great photographs!

Dozens of media outlets collect their best from the past year.

You’ll find links to the best of the best below.

Enjoy!

Time’s 2019 Top 100 Photos
The New York Times Year In Pictures 2019
CNN 2019 Year In Review
CNN’s Best Travel Photos Of 2019
Bloomberg’s Year in Pictures 2019
Bored Panda’s 30 Most Powerful Press Photos Of 2019
Magnum’s Pictures Of The Year 2019
Top AP Photos Of 2019
New York Post’s Best Photos Of 2019
The Guardian’s Best Photographs Of 2019
The Guardian’s A Decade In Pictures 2010-2019
The Atlantic top 25 News Photos Of 2019
The Atlantic The Most 2019 Photos Ever
The Atlantic Photos Of A Decade 2010-2019
Reuter’s Best Photos Of 2019
CBS News Best Photos Of 2019
World Press Photo 2019 Contest Winners
Agora World Photography Competition 2019 Winners
My Modern Met
The Best New Yorker Photography Of 2019
National Geographic
Gizmodo’s Best Wildlife Photos Of 2019
Audubon’s 2019 Photography Award Winners
Business Insider’s Best Wildlife Photos Of 2019
Science’s Favorite Photos Of 2019
Sports Illustrated’s Best Photos Of 2019
The Guardian’s Best Sports Photography Of 2019
Best Photography Books Of 2019 – I
Best Photography Books Of 2019 – II
 
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12 Great Photographs From Chris Rainier's New Book Mask

01_#1 Mask front cover 02_#13 03_#2 NW INDIAN RAVENRainier_Bear_42505_#11 06_#10 07_IMG_9853 copy 08_#3 09_IMG_9851 copy 10_#16 11_IMG_9867 copy 12_#12
In his new book Mask, Chris Rainier focuses his lens on the uses of masks across cultures, religions, and eras to reveal something universal about humanity.
You’ll want to read this book twice. First, just look at it. Then, read the back matter.
The images are extremely powerful on their own yet the book takes us even deeper with the additi0n of ethnographer Robert L Welsch’s comments on the individual masks, traditions, and cultures.
Learn more about Mask and Chris Rainier here.
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The Best Of The Best Photographs Of 2018 Collected

Best Of Best Photographs 2018

The new year is a wonderful time to look at great photographs!

Dozens of media outlets collect their best of the best.

You’ll find links to the best of the best below.

Enjoy!

Pulitzer Prize Winners In Photography 2018

Time Top 100 Photos Of 2018

NY Times The Year In Pictures 2018

Magnum Pictures of the Year 2018

International Photography Awards 2018

World Press Photo 2018

The Guardian Best Photographs 2018

The Atlantic Top New Photos Of 2018

Reuters Pictures Of The Year 2018

The Atlantic Top 25 News Photos Of 2018

Bloomberg The Year In Pictures 2018

NY Times Best Travel Photographs 2018

CNN Best Travel Photos 2018

National Geographic Best Photos Of 2018

Sony World Photography Awards 2018

Lens Culture’s Favorite Photographs Of 2018

My Modern Met Top Photographs From Around The World 2018

Huff Po iPhone Photography Awards 2018

Drone Awards 2018

Audubon Photography Awards 2018

Nikon Small World Photography Winners 2018

The Guardian’s Astronomy Photographer Of The Year Shortlist 2018

Sports Illustrated’s Best Photos of 2018

Car and Driver’s Hottest Car Photos of 2018

Berify’s 11 Famous Portrait Photographers Of 2018

My Modern MET 20 Best Architecture Photos 2018

Best Photography Books Of 2018 – Part 1

Best Photography Books Of 2018 – Part 2

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The Best Photographs Of 2017 Collection

Photos_Best_2017
The new year is a wonderful time to look at great photographs!
Dozens of media outlets collect their best of the best.
You’ll find links to the best of those below.
Enjoy!
Time’s Best Photographs Of 2017
New York Times The Year In Photographs 2017
The World Press Photo Contest Winners 2017
CNN’s The World’s Best Travel Photos 2017
Bloomberg’s 100 Best Photographs Of 2017
Reuter’s Pictures Of The Year 2017
Reuter’s Best Business Photographs Of 2017
Visual Culture’s Most Powerful Moments of Journalism 2017
Sports Illustrated’s Best Photos Of 2017
National Geographic’s Best Photographs Of 2017
The Guardian’s Best Of Wildlife Photography Awards 2017
Audubon’s Photography Awards 2017
CBS Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2017
Nature’s Best Science Images Of 2017
Space’s Most Amazing Space Photographs Of 2017
Popular Science’s Best Picture’s Of The Solar Eclipse 2017
The Huffington Post’s Best iPhone Photographs Of 2017
My Modern Met’s Best Photographs Of 2017
Lens Culture’s 75 Experts Name the Top Photo Books of 2017
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Blend It Out




It’s a perfect shot! If only those unwanted moving objects (UMOs, i.e., a person or a crowd) in the scene would disappear. As long as the unwanted elements in your frame move, even just a little, you can make them disappear from your image by taking two or more shots and using Photoshop’s layering and blending capabilities.
You don’t have to retouch your image. Blending is different than retouching. The unwanted elements aren’t covered over with new information by hiding them with replacement information similar to the surround, either from the same source or another. With blends, the information behind the moving subject is revealed. How? It’s contained in the other shot(s).
You even can do this with exposures that are made with slightly different angles of rotation or framing, so you can use this technique with handheld exposures, not just those made with a tripod. Camera motion may make manual registration difficult, but Photoshop automatically will align and, in some cases, distort the separate exposures so that they register precisely …
Read more at Digital Photo Pro.
Learn more in my digital photography ebooks.
Learn more in my digital photography workshops.

Dehaze

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review Histograms After Exposure

One big advantage of shooting digitally is the ability to view a histogram in the LCD screen on the back of your camera body. A histogram is a graph of the relative distribution of the data in your image from shadows on the left to highlights on the right. You can use a histogram to evaluate not only the tonal distribution but also the quality of your exposures. By viewing the histogram immediately after exposure, you can determine if you need to make additional exposures at alternate settings to get better exposures. Simply program your camera to display a histogram immediately after exposure. You'll find this immediate feedback will result in much higher success rates.


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Continuity


Continuity. Every screenwriter needs to create it. Every storyboard needs to interpret it. Every director needs to guide it. Every editor needs to refine it. If you’re a still photographer, you may be called to do all of these things.
Continuity lies at the heart of the art of storytelling. The types of images selected and the transitions made between images presented in groups can be powerful tools for visual communication. Sequences can provide useful comparisons and contrasts between separate images and their contents. They set a pace and rhythm for looking. Carefully orchestrated they can create the illusion of moving in time forward or backward, linearly or non-linearly. They can be used in extremely creative ways. The best sequences make images clearer, more meaningful, and more moving.
Photographers can use continuity to guide and structure initial explorations on site; use a storyboard as a checklist to make sure no angle goes uncovered. Photographers can use continuity to find missing gaps or resolve challenging transitions in ongoing projects; update a storyboard and find the out what you’ve got too much of and what you don’t have enough of or find a bridges to connect disparate images. Photographers can use continuity to edit, sequence, and present existing work more effectively; fine tune a story in sophisticated and compelling ways; there are many possible solutions.
There are many classic strategies for sequencing images and creating transitions between them.
Persistence
Pans
Zooms
Fades
Numbers
Cuts
Include continuity in your work and you’ll find you’ll be able to solve many more visual challenges in many more ways and make the reception of your work more effective and powerfully felt. Once you understand what the many possibilities are and how they work, you can be extremely creative with them. Some artists have even been celebrated more for their use of continuity than their singular images. Continuity is so powerful that it can be an art in and of itself.
Read more on AfterCapture.
Learn more about storytelling here.
Learn more in my digital photography workshops.

iPhone At Play – Charles Adams


My assistant, Charles Adams, spent this years Maine Fall Foliage Workshop photographing with the iPhone. Below he talks about his experience.
“Making images with an iPhone can be a terrific creative exercise. If you regularly shoot with a DSLR, the iPhone can simplify things and offer a new experience. I found this to be the case during this years fall foliage workshop. I left my Canon in the car along with all of the photographic requirements and responsibilities that I usually attach to it. It was a freeing experience. Suddenly the pressure to make the best photographs of my life was no longer there. I was free to play.
Being able to process your images seconds after shooting them is also key to the iPhone experience. The many apps available make it possible to shoot, edit, share, and get feedback before even getting back in the car. In my case, apps had a direct effect on which pictures I chose to make. I knew I was going to apply water color and oil painting filters to my images, so I tried to shoot accordingly. I set out to find good compositions with strong “bones.” “Bones” meaning solid structure that could benefit from the addition of dramatic effects.
The resulting images were fun to create. Changing the tools you use to make your images can offer new insights into your own photography. I strongly recommend allowing yourself to play.”
Visit Charles’ website here.
Find out about my digital photography workshops here.