PHOTOGRAPH9

“To kick off our new layout, this issue is dedicated to the line, light and shadow of non-colour. Within these 230 pages are portfolios and interviews with these incredible photographers: Jason Bradley, who discusses his extraordinary underwater work and the limitations, challenges, and thrills of it all; Carla Coulson, whose Paris fashion portraiture was borne from leaving her job, moving to France and becoming a published photographer within one year; the architectural style of Julia Anna Gospodarou, who explains how she sees sensual lines in concrete and steel structures; and the beauty of Chicago nights as illuminated by Satoki Nagata, who went from scientist to photographer with striking results.

Each of our regular contributors, John Paul Caponigro, Bruce Percy, Guy Tal, Chris Orwig, Martin Bailey, Piet Van den Eynde, Adam Blasberg, and David duChemin, have dedicated their articles to the art of black and white photography.”

My article Black & White Palettes discusses the many distinct styles you can find and craft to suit your vision within the arena of black and white photography.

Get 20% off through Tuesday.

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You’ll be inspired by this collection of quotes by photographer Sebastiao Salgado.

“I looked through a lens and ended up abandoning everything else.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“When I was just starting out, I met Cartier-Bresson. He wasn’t young in age but, in his mind, he was the youngest person I’d ever met. He told me it was necessary to trust my instincts, be inside my work, and set aside my ego. In the end, my photography turned out very different to his, but I believe we were coming from the same place.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“It is a great honor for me to be compared to Henri Cartier-Bresson…But I believe there is a very big difference in the way we put ourselves inside the stories we photograph. He always strove for the decisive moment as being the most important. I always work for a group of pictures, to tell a story. If you ask which picture in a story I like most, it is impossible for me to tell you this. I don’t work for an individual picture. If I must select one individual picture for a client, it is very difficult for me.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“As long as there’s journalism, there will be photojournalism. They’re two halves of a whole. And although they certainly won’t last forever, for the moment I don’t see either one of them coming to an end. Roland Barthes, in his book Camera Lucida, stated that photography, rather than film or television, is the collective memory of the world. As I see it, he’s right about this. Photography immortalize a moment, which then becomes a symbol, a reference. Photography is universal language; it doesn’t need translation. Its collective memory is a mirror in which our society continually observes itself…” – Sebastiao Salgado

“I’m not an artist. An artist makes an object. Me, it’s not an object, I work in history, I’m a storyteller.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“I can be an artist a posteriori, not a priori. If my pictures tell the story, our story, human story, then in a hundred years, then they can be considered an art reference, but now they are not made as art. I’m a journalist. My life’s on the road, my studio is the planet.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“For me, art is such a wide concept – anything can be art.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“I don’t want anyone to appreciate the light or the palette of tones. I want my pictures to inform, to provoke discussion – and to raise money.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“What I want is the world to remember the problems and the people I photograph. What I want is to create a discussion about what is happening around the world and to provoke some debate with these pictures. Nothing more than this. I don’t want people to look at them and appreciate the light and the palate of tones. I want them to look inside and see what the pictures represent, and the kind of people I photograph.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“I try with my pictures to raise a question, to provoke a debate, so that we can discuss problems together and come up with solutions.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“I am a former economist. I never went to photography school to learn photography.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“I have been photographing the portrait of an end of an era, as machines and computers replace human workers. What we have in these pictures is an archeology.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“You photograph with all your ideology.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“I’m not a religious person. The language of photography is symbolic.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“The language that photography has is a formal language. Any photographer is doing something formal. If it’s formal, then it must be an aesthetic way to communicate.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“Most of the information we now get is through television and is mutilated. Photography offers the opportunity to spend much more time on a topic. It’s relatively cheaper medium, and can allow a photographer really to live in another place, show another reality, get closer to the truth.” – Sebastiao Salgado
“When you work fast, what you put in your pictures is what your brought with yoiu — your own ideas and concepts. When you spend more time on a project, you learn to understand your subjects. There comes a time when it is not you who is taking the pictures. Something special happens between the photographer and the people he is photographing. He realizes that they are giving the pictures to him.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“There comes a moment when it is no longer you who takes the photograph, but receives the way to do it quite naturally and fully.

“You need to be accepted by reality.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“It’s not the photographer who makes the picture, but the person being photographed.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“The picture is not made by the photographer, the picture is more good or less good in function of the relationship that you have with the people you photograph.” ― Sebastião Salgado

“I have tried to bring about better communication between people. I believe that humanitarian photography is like economics. Economy is a kind of sociology, as is documentary photography.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“We live in a society where we never prepare people to be a community.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“We are one human race, and there must be understanding among all men. For those who look at the problems of today, my big hope is that they understand. That they understand that the population is quite big enough, that they must be informed that they must have economic development, that they must have social development, and must be integrated into all parts of the world.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“I work alone. Humans are incredible, because when you come alone, they will receive you, they accept you, they protect you, they give you all things that you need, and they teach you all things you must know. When you come with two persons or three persons, you have a group in front of them. They don’t discuss with the new persons what is important to them…” – Sebastiao Salgado

“I tell a little bit of my life to them, and they tell a little of theirs to me. The picture itself is just the tip of the iceberg.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“There are moments that you suffer a lot, moments you won’t photograph. There are some people you like better than others. But you give, you receive, you cherish, you are there. When you are really there, you know when you see the picture later what you are seeing.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“If you take a picture of a human that does not make him noble, there is no reason to take this picture. That is my way of seeing things.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“I very much like to work on long-term projects…There is time for the photographer and the people in front of the camera to understand each other. There is time to go to a place and understand what is happening there. …When you spend more time on a project, you learn to understand your subjects. There comes a time when it is not you who is taking the pictures. Something special happens between the photographer and the people he is photographing. He realizes that they are giving the pictures to him.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“So many times I’ve photographed stories that show the degradation of the planet. I had one idea to go and photograph the factories that were polluting, and to see all the deposits of garbage. But, in the end, I thought the only way to give us an incentive, to bring hope, is to show the pictures of the pristine planet – to see the innocence.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“I discovered that close to half the planet is ‘pristine.’ We live in towns such as London, Paris or Sao Paulo and have the impression that all the pristine areas are gone, but they are not.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“We are animals, born from the land with the other species. Since we’ve been living in cities, we’ve become more and more stupid, not smarter. What made us survive all these hundreds of thousands of years is our spirituality; the link to our land.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“In the end, the only heritage we have is our planet, and I have decided to go to the most pristine places on the planet and photograph them in the most honest way I know, with my point of view, and of course it is in black and white, because it is the only thing I know how to do.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“I don’t believe a person has a style. What people have is a way of photographing what is inside them. What is there comes out.” – Sebastiao Salgado

“…my way of photographing is my way of life. I photograph from my experience, my way of seeing things…” – Sebastiao Salgado

“Of course, I won’t be abandoning photography, because it is my life.” – Sebastiao Salgado

Explore The Essential Collection of Quotes By Photographers here.

View The Essential Collection Of Photographers Documentaries here.

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“Salgado likens GENESIS to ‘my love letter to the planet.’ Over 30 trips –  travelled by foot, light aircraft, seagoing vessels, canoes, and even balloons, through extreme heat and cold and in sometimes dangerous conditions – Salgado created a collection of images showing us nature, animals,and indigenous peoples in breathtaking beauty.”
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“Whereas the limited Collector’s Edition is conceived like a large-format portfolio that meanders across the planet, this unlimited book presents a selection of photographs arranged in five chapters geographically: Planet South, Sanctuaries, Africa, Northern Spaces, Amazonia and Pantanal. Each in its own way, this book and the Collector’s edition—both edited and designed by Lélia Wanick Salgado—pay homage to Salgado’s triumphant and unparalleled GENESIS project.”
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Find out more about the book here.
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View Salgado’s TED talk here.
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View Salgado’s talk The Photographer As Activist here.

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Sebastiao Salgado’s must see exhibit Genesis is on display at ICP (NYC) September 19 – January 11, 2015.

“Genesis is the third long-term series on global issues by world-renowned photographer Sebastião Salgado (born Brazil, 1944), following Workers (1993) and Migrations (2000). The result of an eight-year worldwide survey, the exhibition draws together more than 200 spectacular black-and-white photographs of wildlife, landscapes, seascapes, and indigenous peoples—raising public awareness about the pressing issues of environment and climate change. ICP is proud to be the first U.S. venue of this momentous exhibition, which is curated by Lélia Wanick Salgado.”

View Salgado’s TED talk here.

View Salgado’s talk The Photographer As Activist here.

This BAFTA award-winning BBC series with John Berger rapidly became regarded as one of the most influential art programs ever made.

In the first program, Berger examines the impact of photography on our appreciation of art from the past.

This second program deals with the portrayal of the female nude, an important part of the tradition of European art. Berger examines these paintings and asks whether they celebrate women as they really are or only as men would like them to be.

In the third program, John Berger questions the value we place on that tradition.

In the fourth program, Berger analyses the images of advertising and publicity and shows how they relate to the tradition of oil painting – in moods, relationships and poses.

Find Berger’s seminal book Ways Of Seeing here.

View The Essential Collection of Documentaries On Photographers.

Read The Essential Collection of Photographer’s Quotes here.

Read conversations with photographers here.

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My free October 2014 Desktop Calendar features a new image from The Pumice Stone Fields, Argentina.

Download it here.

Luminous Endowment for Photographers from The Luminous Landscape on Vimeo.

The Luminous Endowment for Photographers is a charitable fund created by Michael Reichmann. The Endowment provides financial assistance through grants to deserving photographers and their projects – worldwide.

Michael Reichmann is the founder of the widely respected Luminous Landscape web site. Since its inception in 1999 LuLa has become the world’s largest site devoted to the art, craft, and technology of photography. Each month more than one million people from every country on the globe visit LuLa.

Through The Luminous Endowment Michael is now creating a global community of those who can give, along with those who will benefit from the generosity of others. It is hoped that the worldwide community of photographers, corporations, and other supporters of the art and craft of photography, will participate in generously endowing and furthering the goals of The Luminous Endowment for Photographers.

Grant jurors include John Paul  Caponigro, Joe Cornish, Eric Meola, Peter Cox, Mikkel Aaland, Ctein, Katrin Eismann, Alain Briot, Tim Wolcott, Sean Reid, William Neill, Andy Biggs, Nick Rains, and Ken Duncan.

Find out more about The Luminous Endowment here.

Meet the Jury Panel.

Get with Michael Reichman’s 400 page retrospective book with your donation today!

VersaceQA

Vincent Versace provides quick candid answers to 20 questions.

What’s the thing that interests you most about your own photographs?
They are all images of moments that took me, I did not take them.

What’s the thing that interests you most about other people’s photographs?
The way the world took them.

What’s the most useful photographic mantra?
Don’t take photographs. Be taken by your photographs.

Read the rest of Vincent’s Q&A here.

Read Vincent’s favorite quotes here.  

Read more 20 Questions With Photographers here.

Read more Photographer’s Favorite Quotes here.

Looking into the Light_Cover_smaller

An exercise too late for the book Looking Into The Light.

“I write to find out what I have to say.” Charles Wright

That’s how creativity works. You can try to conceptualize it all you want, but when you begin, it starts to come out completely different … if your lucky. Even if you do it all wrong, you learn more than you ever would by thinking.

That’s why exercises function as the heart of my workshops, and new ones occur to me all the time, so many that I never get to a fraction of them in a class.

The best of them literally take you beyond yourself. When that happens, you suddenly wake up way past whatever it was you thought you were going to do.  You’re like a kid who is learning to ride a bicycle and looks back to see the parent you thought was running beside you and steadying you standing 50 yards back and grinning. And you realize that you’ve been riding your bike and balancing just fine on your own.

That’s what I want out of an exercise.

This summer an idea came to me in the middle of a workshop. I told people to go out, wander around, and make photographs of a place where something had happened. That was it.

My thought was that at least it might get people to really pay attention and just be where they were, see the light, the energy, see what the place felt like. Then they could make some pictures.

So off they went to spend a rainy afternoon working this out, and the next morning we gathered to screen the pictures. When the first ones came up I got a surprise. People had actually written down the thing that they felt might have happened. And the things they had written down completely charged the pictures, and ignited the classes imaginations. They were like short clips from films, and they made you want to see the rest of it.

Here’s one. You’ll see what I mean.

Picture 1_Michelle Elloway

 

Michelle Elloway

I think this one with the swings was the first up, and the menace and sadness that grew out of the picture of these children’s playthings was palpable. Everyone felt the dark possibilities in it.

Here are a few more …

Picture 2_Antelo Devereux

Antelo Devereux

Picture 3_Kemal Berk Kocabagli

Kemal Berk Kocabagli

What I loved about what people did was that they took ordinary situations into their imaginations and made the pictures suggest stories without telling them. They left plenty of space for viewers to complete them in their own minds.  We all became participants.

So there it is, the perfect kind of exercise. It was kind of like finding a mushroom with a note that said Eat me. Whenever that happens … eat the mushroom!

Find out more about Sean Kernan’s ebook Looking Into The Light here.

Find out more about Sean Kernan here.

“A fantastic documentary on one of the key people in the history of cinema. A portrait of the pioneering photographer, forefather of cinema, showman and murderer Eadweard Muybridge. Born in Kingston upon Thames, Muybridge did his most famous work in California, where his experiments in early cinema and the public projection of his images using a machine he invented astounded audiences worldwide.”

View The Essential Collection of Documentaries On Photographers.

Read The Essential Collection of Photographer’s Quotes here.

Read conversations with photographers here.


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