SalgadoGenesis_Book
“Salgado likens GENESIS to ‘my love letter to the planet.’ Over 30 trips –  travelled by foot, light aircraft, seagoing vessels, canoes, and even balloons, through extreme heat and cold and in sometimes dangerous conditions – Salgado created a collection of images showing us nature, animals,and indigenous peoples in breathtaking beauty.”
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“Whereas the limited Collector’s Edition is conceived like a large-format portfolio that meanders across the planet, this unlimited book presents a selection of photographs arranged in five chapters geographically: Planet South, Sanctuaries, Africa, Northern Spaces, Amazonia and Pantanal. Each in its own way, this book and the Collector’s edition—both edited and designed by Lélia Wanick Salgado—pay homage to Salgado’s triumphant and unparalleled GENESIS project.”
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Find out more about the book here.
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View Salgado’s TED talk here.
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View Salgado’s talk The Photographer As Activist here.

salgado_genesis

Sebastiao Salgado’s must see exhibit Genesis is on display at ICP (NYC) September 19 – January 11, 2015.

“Genesis is the third long-term series on global issues by world-renowned photographer Sebastião Salgado (born Brazil, 1944), following Workers (1993) and Migrations (2000). The result of an eight-year worldwide survey, the exhibition draws together more than 200 spectacular black-and-white photographs of wildlife, landscapes, seascapes, and indigenous peoples—raising public awareness about the pressing issues of environment and climate change. ICP is proud to be the first U.S. venue of this momentous exhibition, which is curated by Lélia Wanick Salgado.”

View Salgado’s TED talk here.

View Salgado’s talk The Photographer As Activist here.

This BAFTA award-winning BBC series with John Berger rapidly became regarded as one of the most influential art programs ever made.

In the first program, Berger examines the impact of photography on our appreciation of art from the past.

This second program deals with the portrayal of the female nude, an important part of the tradition of European art. Berger examines these paintings and asks whether they celebrate women as they really are or only as men would like them to be.

In the third program, John Berger questions the value we place on that tradition.

In the fourth program, Berger analyses the images of advertising and publicity and shows how they relate to the tradition of oil painting – in moods, relationships and poses.

Find Berger’s seminal book Ways Of Seeing here.

View The Essential Collection of Documentaries On Photographers.

Read The Essential Collection of Photographer’s Quotes here.

Read conversations with photographers here.

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My free October 2014 Desktop Calendar features a new image from The Pumice Stone Fields, Argentina.

Download it here.

Luminous Endowment for Photographers from The Luminous Landscape on Vimeo.

The Luminous Endowment for Photographers is a charitable fund created by Michael Reichmann. The Endowment provides financial assistance through grants to deserving photographers and their projects – worldwide.

Michael Reichmann is the founder of the widely respected Luminous Landscape web site. Since its inception in 1999 LuLa has become the world’s largest site devoted to the art, craft, and technology of photography. Each month more than one million people from every country on the globe visit LuLa.

Through The Luminous Endowment Michael is now creating a global community of those who can give, along with those who will benefit from the generosity of others. It is hoped that the worldwide community of photographers, corporations, and other supporters of the art and craft of photography, will participate in generously endowing and furthering the goals of The Luminous Endowment for Photographers.

Grant jurors include John Paul  Caponigro, Joe Cornish, Eric Meola, Peter Cox, Mikkel Aaland, Ctein, Katrin Eismann, Alain Briot, Tim Wolcott, Sean Reid, William Neill, Andy Biggs, Nick Rains, and Ken Duncan.

Find out more about The Luminous Endowment here.

Meet the Jury Panel.

Get with Michael Reichman’s 400 page retrospective book with your donation today!

VersaceQA

Vincent Versace provides quick candid answers to 20 questions.

What’s the thing that interests you most about your own photographs?
They are all images of moments that took me, I did not take them.

What’s the thing that interests you most about other people’s photographs?
The way the world took them.

What’s the most useful photographic mantra?
Don’t take photographs. Be taken by your photographs.

Read the rest of Vincent’s Q&A here.

Read Vincent’s favorite quotes here.  

Read more 20 Questions With Photographers here.

Read more Photographer’s Favorite Quotes here.

Looking into the Light_Cover_smaller

An exercise too late for the book Looking Into The Light.

“I write to find out what I have to say.” Charles Wright

That’s how creativity works. You can try to conceptualize it all you want, but when you begin, it starts to come out completely different … if your lucky. Even if you do it all wrong, you learn more than you ever would by thinking.

That’s why exercises function as the heart of my workshops, and new ones occur to me all the time, so many that I never get to a fraction of them in a class.

The best of them literally take you beyond yourself. When that happens, you suddenly wake up way past whatever it was you thought you were going to do.  You’re like a kid who is learning to ride a bicycle and looks back to see the parent you thought was running beside you and steadying you standing 50 yards back and grinning. And you realize that you’ve been riding your bike and balancing just fine on your own.

That’s what I want out of an exercise.

This summer an idea came to me in the middle of a workshop. I told people to go out, wander around, and make photographs of a place where something had happened. That was it.

My thought was that at least it might get people to really pay attention and just be where they were, see the light, the energy, see what the place felt like. Then they could make some pictures.

So off they went to spend a rainy afternoon working this out, and the next morning we gathered to screen the pictures. When the first ones came up I got a surprise. People had actually written down the thing that they felt might have happened. And the things they had written down completely charged the pictures, and ignited the classes imaginations. They were like short clips from films, and they made you want to see the rest of it.

Here’s one. You’ll see what I mean.

Picture 1_Michelle Elloway

 

Michelle Elloway

I think this one with the swings was the first up, and the menace and sadness that grew out of the picture of these children’s playthings was palpable. Everyone felt the dark possibilities in it.

Here are a few more …

Picture 2_Antelo Devereux

Antelo Devereux

Picture 3_Kemal Berk Kocabagli

Kemal Berk Kocabagli

What I loved about what people did was that they took ordinary situations into their imaginations and made the pictures suggest stories without telling them. They left plenty of space for viewers to complete them in their own minds.  We all became participants.

So there it is, the perfect kind of exercise. It was kind of like finding a mushroom with a note that said Eat me. Whenever that happens … eat the mushroom!

Find out more about Sean Kernan’s ebook Looking Into The Light here.

Find out more about Sean Kernan here.

“A fantastic documentary on one of the key people in the history of cinema. A portrait of the pioneering photographer, forefather of cinema, showman and murderer Eadweard Muybridge. Born in Kingston upon Thames, Muybridge did his most famous work in California, where his experiments in early cinema and the public projection of his images using a machine he invented astounded audiences worldwide.”

View The Essential Collection of Documentaries On Photographers.

Read The Essential Collection of Photographer’s Quotes here.

Read conversations with photographers here.

Looking into the Light_Cover_smaller

“Years ago I stumbled on what felt like a secret door into creativity in photography. The secret is that photographers don’t need to hope that creativity will turn up. It’s there in us. Creativity is not something we do, it’s something we are…all the time.” says Kernan.

Sean Kernan has spent more than 30 years investigating ways that photographers find and use creativity. And all that insight now fills a workshop-in-a-book, Looking into the Light: Creativity and Photography, now available as an iBook.

Kernan’s book offers ways to get to that creativity for photographers at every level, bright beginner to jaded professional. It looks past cameras and technique to focus on our awareness. “We work on our awareness of all the things that happen before the click, which I’m convinced is where the wonder of our best seeing comes from.”

The book gives a series of concrete assignments that stimulate the visual imagination and change our pictures. The sign that they’re working is when we get a hit of the excitement we felt the first time we took a photograph that was way beyond anything we thought we could do.

The exercises are gathered from many areas—music, theater, writing—and they all involve simple things we already know how to do. We can use them to make better photos, or just to see more deeply into what is around us. The goal is to make pictures that talk to the world, not just to other photographers. As Jay Maisel put it, “You want to take more interesting pictures? Be a more interesting person!”

Looking into the Light illustrates the exercises with work from a distinguished group that includes John Paul Caponigro, Greg Heisler, Cig Harvey, Jay Gould, Dennis Darling, Adam Arkin, poet Gregory Orr, Ed Young, Paul Cezanne, Edgar Degas, Sol LeWitt, William Kentridge, and Sir Joshua Reynolds. There’s an iconoclastic essay on portraits by Duane Michals and links to interviews with Duane and Robert Frank.

To support reader’s efforts, the author has created a companion website at www.lookingintothelight.com, where readers can find further articles, watch instructive videos, and upload and share their own work on the assignments.”

Read 20 Questions with Sean Kernan here.

Quotes_Connection-1

Here’s a collection of my favorite quotes on making connections.

“Creativity is just connecting things. When you ask creative people how they did something, they feel a little guilty because they didn’t really do it, they just saw something. It seemed obvious to them after a while. That’s because they were able to connect experiences they’ve had and synthesize new things.” – Steve Jobs

“Any fact becomes important when it’s connected to another.” ― Umberto Eco

“Facts are stupid until brought into connection with some general law.” – Louis Agassiz

“Any method by which you get to see things that you haven’t seen before hones your practiced ability to make connections.” — Stephen Metcalf

“Drawing is a way of coming upon the connection between things, just like metaphor in poetry reconnects what has become separated.” – John Berger

“A book is like a piece of rope; it takes on meaning only in connection with the things it holds together.” – Norman Cousins

“The future of publishing is about having connections to readers and the knowledge of what those readers want.” – Seth Godin

“Green business is not about tie-dyed T-shirts. It’s about transforming the industrial system itself into one that looks at all the connections.” – Paul Hawken

“Eventually everything connects – people, ideas, objects. The quality of the connections is the key to quality per se.” – Charles Eames

“Our life is composed greatly from dreams, from the unconscious, and they must be brought into connection with action. They must be woven together.” – Anais Nin

“One must always maintain one’s connection to the past and yet ceaselessly pull away from it.” – Gaston Bachelard

“That was a memorable day to me, for it made great changes in me. But it is the same with any life. Imagine one selected day struck out of it, and think how different its course would have been. Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation of the first link on one memorable day.” ― Charles Dickens

“A hidden connection is stronger than an obvious one.” – Heraclitus of Ephesus

“Invisible threads are the strongest ties.” ― Friedrich Nietzsche

“When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe. -John Muir

“A typical neuron makes about ten thousand connections to neighboring neurons. Given the billions of neurons, this means there are as many connections in a single cubic centimeter of brain tissue as there are stars in the Milky Way galaxy.” – David Eagleman

“In the human mind, the number of possible connections that can be made between neurons greatly exceeds the number of atoms in the universe.” – Alan Moore

View The Essential Collection of Creativity Quotes here.

Discover more quotes daily in my Twitter and Facebook streams.


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