Maisel_QuotesFav

Jay Maisel shares his favorite quotes.

This is my favorite from his selection.

We do not take pictures, we are taken by pictures. – Ernst Haas

Which is your favorite of his selected quotes?

Read more of Jay’s favorite quotes here.

Read Jay’s quick Q&A here.

Find out more about Jay Maisel here.

Read more Photographer’s Favorite Quotes here. 

Maisel_NY50s

Jay Maisel’s new book New York In The ’50s offers a unique window into an iconic city by an iconic photographer. Know primarily for his color work this book offers a rare glimpse into his early black and white photography. Photographer Sean Kernan said it brilliantly, “It’s all the wit you’d expect from Jay with none of the color.”

Here’s what Jay says about New York In The ’50s.

“I have been shooting New York for over 60 years now. And though I have achieved age, I can safely say I have never made my way to maturity so I have never been jaded or bored. I think all this is due to the grittiness and hectic quality of the city, you never capture it, it captures you.” After studying painting and graphic design at Cooper Union and Yale, Jay Maisel began his career in photography in 1954. While his portfolio includes the likes of Marilyn Monroe and Miles Davis, he is perhaps best known for capturing the light, color, and gesture found in every day life. This unique vision kept him busy for over 40 years shooting annual reports, magazine covers, jazz albums, advertising and more for an array of clients worldwide. Recently, Maisel has gone back to his archive of early work, and put together a collection of black-and-white images he made as a young man in the 1950s, evidence of a lifetime’s pursuit of a craft and a special talent, one of the best-kept secrets in photographic history. “New York in the ‘50s” is a beautifully-produced monograph that will be equally appreciated by Jay Maisel’s followers, and anyone who has stepped inside his muse, New York City.”

Find out more about Jay Maisel’s New York In The ’50s here.

Julieanne Kost demonstrates how to make selections based on depth of field using Focus Mask to help isolate portions of your image for further editing.

View more Photoshop Videos here.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital imaging workshops.

Incubation II

Photographer Eric Meola and I share our insights on the creative process in this three-part conversation. In the first installment, I share the influences of my parents and meetings with many remarkable men and women including Eliot Porter, Ansel Adams, and Georgia O’Keeffe. Then we discuss the power of words.

“Words can be powerful tools. Think of all the things you can do with words. Generate ideas. Clarify a response. Determine a goal. Frame a question. Evaluate strengths and weaknesses. Make comparisons and contrasts. Identify an influence. Select an approach. Test a theory. Explore alternatives. Identify what’s missing. Solve a problem. Advocate. Motivate. Evaluate. Find a new direction.

No matter what discipline you’re in, why wouldn’t you use these powerful tools we call words? Try not using them! Can you? So why not use them well and unlock as much of their power as you can?

Many linguists have explored how language influences thought, going almost as far as saying language is thought. Benjamin Whorf said, “Language is not simply a reporting device for experience but a framework for it.” If a culture has a lot of words for something, it indicates those people have a highly developed relationship with it. If a culture doesn’t have a word for something, it indicates either a very different relationship to a subject or a blind spot. Certain tribes in the Amazon jungle have many words for green, but none for blue. The Inuit have dozens of words for snow. We currently have too few words for photography. (At best, we amend the word photography with other words—photojournalism and photo illustration.) Look at all the words we have for various kinds of writing: fiction, non-fiction, poetry, prose, journalism, journaling, interview, biography, autobiography, screenplay, short story, novel, trilogy, epic, lyric, etc, etc, etc. The photographic community and culture at large would do well to repurpose many words drawn from our literary traditions and use them in our visual traditions.

The question is not, “Should I manipulate a photograph?” Since the invention of photography, all kinds of things have been done to photographs. The question is, “What happens when I do or don’t manipulate a photograph?”

Limited language wastes time and results in less productive debates and diverts attention away from more productive discussions. One of the fundamental things I’m trying to address through my work is complicated by limited language. Our culture often talks about people versus nature; we use words like “us” and “it.” We draw lines and take sides. Our current use of language psychologically distances us. This makes it harder to describe people as parts of nature. If we enter that mindset, we think about ourselves and act in our world differently.”

Read the rest of Part I here.

Read Part II here.

Read my interview of Eric here.

Reading_Abstraction

Looking for great books on abstraction?

Browse this collection of my favorites.

This collection gathers classics from artists, psychologists, and scientists alike.

Enjoy!

Find more great books here.

lead

The high ISO capability of today’s new camera models is a true game changer. It opens up a range of light previously unexplored in the history of photography. Fearing noise, many people unnecessarily limit themselves to the lowest ISO setting and never explore this incredible range of light with all of its unique qualities—and surprises. (Don’t fear noise. Instead, read my series of articles.) Try night photography, and you’ll quickly realize the camera eye now can show you more than the eye can see. There have been many times now when I make exposures just to see what’s out there. Practice the art of night photography, and you’ll learn to see in new ways.

What settings should you use when making exposures in low light or at night? Use a tripod and cable release, set ISO to 800 (or higher), open up to ƒ/5.6 or wider, focus at infinity, and keep exposures below 20 seconds. While this is a good starting point, that’s all it is, as you’ll need to modify settings based on the specific light(s) in a location, the equipment you’re using and the effect you want to produce. Instead, ask yourself what concerns do you need to be mindful of, and what points of control do you have when making low-light or night photographs? Develop your sensitivity to these factors, and you’ll know why and when to improvise and even what more you can explore. These tips will give you a solid foundation from which to begin your explorations in low-light and night photography.

1. Use A Tripod.

2. Use A Cable Release Or An Intervalometer.

3. Use Bulb Mode.

4. Use Mirror Lock-Up.

5. Use A Good Fast Lens.

6. Reduce Star Trails With Short Exposure Times—Or Go For Broke.

7. Find The Infinity Focus Point.

8. Use High ISO.

9. Check Histograms.

10. Consider HDR Techniques.

11. Use Camera Exposure Noise Reduction Sparingly.

12. Master Noise-Reduction Postprocessing.

13. Consider Adding An Artificial Light Source.

14. Test The Variables.

When you start practicing high-ISO photography, you’ll begin to see many more possibilities for making images. You’ll soon discover yourself savoring the many qualities of light long before and long after sunset. There’s so much waiting to be discovered in low-light and night photography, so go explore it! And use these tips to help guide your explorations.

Read the rest of this article on Digital Photo Pro.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

16 Great Books On Color

September 2, 2014 | 2 Comments |

Reading_425

Looking for great books on color?

Browse this collection of my favorites.

This collection covers a wide range of aspects of the rich phenomenon including physics, biology, psychology, history and theory.

Enjoy!

Find more great books here.

201409_Calendar_425

My free September 2014 Desktop Calendar features a new image from Skeleton Coast, Namibia.

Download it here.

201408_Insights

My enews Insights broadcasts today at 3:15 pm EST.

In this issue …

I’m announcing our next Fly Antarctica / Sail Across The Circle Workshop. Participants were thrilled this winter and we can’t wait to go back! Space is limited so reserve yours now! There’s 1 space left in our Greenland Ice Fiords & Auroras Workshop.

Seth Resnick and I have released a new ebook Antarctica / Two Visions. In addition to inspiring you with images of Antarctica, it will give you many insights into how much we’ve influenced each other by working so closely together and yet still remain so different. It’s free for a limited time only!

Three Raw Processing Resources and 21 Recommended Books On Digital Processing will help you make the most of your files.

Find out about photographer Wynn Bullock - a new exhibit, new book, and classic quotes.

Sign up for my enews Collectors Alert and get a one time only 50% print discount.

There’s more … exhibits, lectures, articles, calendars, green actions, etc.

Enjoy!

Sign up for Insights enews free here. 

“Julieanne takes a close look at the feature enhancements and refinements made to the Crop tool, workflow settings, and batch saving capabilities in Adobe Camera Raw. In addition she also covers improvements made to the Spot Removal Tool, Noise Reduction, Local Adjustment Brush, and Histogram.”

View more Photshop Videos here.

Learn more in my digital printing and digital photography workshops here.


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