Lightroom 5 Beta Resources Roundup


Lightroom 5 Beta is now available! Download it here.
Useful LR5 resources are posted by Adobe, NAPP, and Photoshop Café.
Here’s a list of and links to those resources.
Photoshop.com
LR5 Advanced Healing Brush
LR5 Radial Filter
LR5 Upright
LR5 – Terry White’s Top 5 Features
NAPP Lightroom 5 Launch Center
LR5 Smart Filters
LR5 Cloning Healing
LR5 Spot
LR5 The Radial
LR5 Upright
LR5 Book Changes
LR5 Slideshow
LR5 Tips
Plus, check out this free NAPP PDF and Lightroom eMagazine.
Photoshop Café Lightroom 5 Training Center
LR5 Colin Smith’s Top 10 New Features
LR5 Advanced Healing Brush
LR5 Radial Filter
LR5 Upright Image Correction
LR5 Video Slideshows
Using LR5 is a great way to get familiar with the latest new features. Remember, this free early beta version will expire after the final release. It does not upgrade previous versions. Many changes made with LR5 will not be backwardly compatible. (Word has it that there are issues with Drobo systems, so if you use one exercise caution.)
Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

Controlling Selective Color Changes In Lightroom – Julianne Kost


“In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne demonstrates how to use Hue, Saturation, Luminance and the Adjustment Brush to selectively control color in Lighrroom Note: although this video was recorded in Lightroom, the same techniques are available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS6.”
View more Photoshop videos here.
Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

Why Does The Photograph’s Preview Change In Lightroom & Bridge? – Julianne Kost


” Julieanne Kost explains one of the great mysteries of Lightroom and Bridge – why Lightroom (or Bridge) displays a photograph one way and then changes the way it looks a moment later. It will all become clear with just a little information about how digital camera files are captured and displayed by different applications.”
View more Photoshop videos here.
Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

Converting Images to Black and White in Lightroom 4 – Julianne Kost


“In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates the best way to convert images to Black and White in Lightroom as well as how to save presets to increase your productivity.  Click here to download the presets discussed in the video. Note: although this video was recorded in Lightroom, the same techniques are available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS6.”
Read more with my B&W ebooks.
View more in my DVD B&W Mastery.
Learn more in my B&W Digital Printing workshop.

Beyond ETTR & HDR Tonemapping – 32 Bit In Lightroom

Image by Ragnar th Sigurdsson.

To one degree or another, we’ve all been underexposing our digital photographs, even if we’ve been exposing to the right (ETTR). Imagine a day when every ƒ-stop had as much data as the lightest ƒ-stop. It’s here now. Here’s how.

Make a series of bracketed exposures where each ƒ-stop in a scene is placed in the far right of the histogram or recorded with half the data in a single digital file. Combine all the exposures into a single 32-bit file using either the Merge To HDR Pro feature in Adobe Bridge/Photoshop or Lightroom. Save or import this 32-bit file into Lightroom (4 or higher) and apply adjustments with its Develop module to avoid many common tone-mapping artifacts.

You may be surprised to find that you’ll benefit from using this technique even for images with significantly more restrained dynamic ranges.

Read more on Digital Photo Pro.
Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

Output Sharpening


Image source, frequency of detail, subject, personal preference, output device, substrate or presentation device, and presentation size all play a role in sharpening.The art of sharpening gives you precise control over various image characteristics—contrast, saturation, contour (halo and line), texture and noise. It's best applied in three stages: capture, creative and output.

While there's an art to sharpening, which provides extraordinary creative freedoms, some aspects of sharpening are best automated, such as output sharpening.

Output sharpening is used to compensate for the softening of detail that a specific device produces. Ink on paper, whether applied with an offset press or an inkjet printer, is notably susceptible to this. When drops of ink hit paper, they deform on impact and spread more or less based on the absorption characteristics of the substrate. This is called dot gain; the dots gain size. Dot gain varies with the type of printer, ink and substrate used. It also can be impacted by environmental factors such as humidity. Output sharpening typically also factors in file resolution and the scale of the final product, which is used to determine an ideal viewing distance—though the actual viewing distance is usually variable.


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