“The industry’s most respected photographers, brought together for the new Print Your Legacy campaign from Epson, talk about what drew them to photography, the inspiration that drives their work and the stories behind their most famous images.”

Hear these photographers celebrate the power of the print.

John Paul Caponigro
Jeremy Cowart
Gregory Crewdson
Steve McCurry
Mark Seliger
Tim Tadder
Amy Toensing
Stephen Wilkes

EpsonLegacyPapers

“Legacy Papers marry the artistry of revered European paper making with the latest advancements in inkjet coating technology.

Working with the finest paper mills in Germany and France we first specify the type of base required for each of the Legacy papers. Once the base is produced, advanced microporus coatings are applied using modern techniques for the highest quality and consistency.

Only after meeting hundreds of design specifications, while ensuring for a high rate of production consistency for the richest blacks, outstanding color fidelity and smooth tonal transitions, will a paper carry the Epson Legacy name.”

The First Four Epson Legacy Papers

  • Legacy Platine: 100 percent cotton fibre paper with a bright OBA-free, smooth satin finish. With a unique feel of an artistic paper of centuries past, along with an outstanding color gamut, this paper is exceptional for both color and black and white printmaking.
  • Legacy Fibre: 100 percent cotton fibre paper with an exceptionally bright OBA-free, smooth matte finish. With an outstanding black density, this paper is ideal for all types of high-end printmaking.
  • Legacy Baryta: A baryta paper with a white, smooth satin finish, utilizing two barium sulfate coatings. Inspired by the F64 group, this paper takes the best of revered silver halide technology to new levels of quality.
  • Legacy Etching: 100 percent cotton fibre paper with a bright OBA-free, uniquely textured matte finish beloved by artists for centuries. This paper has the feel of traditional etching papers.

Find out more here.

“The combination of Epson Legacy Paper and Epson UltraChrome® HD and HDX pigment ink technology can provide up to twice the Display Permanence Ratings of previous generation inks, according to tests conducted by the Wilhelm Imaging Research, Inc.”

Find out more here.

Epson’s new Legacy Papers are the finest papers I’ve ever used.

Find out more about Epson Legacy Papers here.

Hear what other photographers are saying about them.

Use them in my digital printing workshops.

Recently on TWIP’s (This Week In Photoshop) The Fix I spoke with Jan Kabili about the power of printing your photographs. Then I demonstrated how to get the best results possible with Softproofing & Proofing practices. Watch this and you’re sure to get better prints in less time with less waste.

Find more useful videos on TWIP’s The Fix here.

Read more with my free Color Management and Printing resources.

View more in my DVD series R/Evolution.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

EpsonP800

“Epson recently announced the highly anticipated SureColor® P800 printer, representing a new benchmark in photographic print quality. Designed for professional use, the SureColor P800 is a full 17” wide borderless printer with unique Epson® MicroPiezo® AMCTM printhead technology. Leveraging an all-new Epson UltraChrome® HD eight-color pigment ink set, the SureColor P800 is capable of producing the next generation of color and black-and-white prints that will inspire us all.”

An optional Roll Paper Adapter, for panoramic prints up to 10’ long, will be available for the P800.

Read more about the P800 here.

This news brings two milestones; black density and longevity.

Initial color tests suggest that the new printer / ink technology is capable of delivering a maximum black (dmax) exceeding 2.8 (previously 2.5). By comparison selenium toned silver gelatin is close to 2.4.

And …

Initial longevity test suggest that longevity is improved – dramatically.

“WIR Display Permanence Ratings for black and white prints made with UltraChrome HD inks using Epson’s “Advanced Black and White Print Mode” will likely exceed 400 years.” “The new UltraChrome HD pigment inks are also expected to have WIR Album and Dark Storage Permanence Ratings well in excess of 200 years.”

“With the increased Dmax, wider color gamut, and reduced metamerism provided by the new Epson UltraChrome HD pigment inks – which taken together serve to significantly enhance the visual brilliance of both color and black and white images – the increased overall permanence of the prints represents a significant contribution to photography,” said Henry Wilhelm, founder and director of research at Wilhelm Imaging Research.

Read more about the P800 permanence ratings here.

Yes! You can test the P800 in my digital printing workshops.

Learn more in my digital printing workshops.

Reading_PhotoDigitalPrinting

Looking for great books on digital printing? Browse this collection of my favorites.

From state-of-the-art inkjet pure and simple to hybrids that incorporate historic processes, these books cover a wide range of topics, offering a wealth of valuable information.

Enjoy!

Find more great books here.

AestheticsOfPrintPDF

Half of the battle is knowing how to do something. The other half is knowing what to do. When it comes to making fine photographic prints, the road has been well mapped by our predecessors. One of the best ways to educate yourself about great print quality is to look at a number of great prints (directly rather than through reproduction). And, to keep on looking. Education, or enrichment, is a dynamic, evolving, lifelong process. Every time you look, sensitively with awareness, your vision grows. There’s always something more to learn.

A combination of elements (and their relationships to one another) is often evaluated when assessing print quality. Speaking very broadly, you could say, it’s all about believably reproducing detail. Focus, depth of field, high dynamic range, tonality, color balance, elimination of process artifacts all play a role. So do the selection of appropriate materials, scale, presentation and contextualization. There’s a lot more to it than you might think at first and though there are no hard and fast rules there are conventions everyone should be mindful of. There’s also a lot of room for creativity.

All of this is expanded and detailed in this free PDF – The Aesthetics Of Print.

Subscribe to Insights enews and download it free.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

LimitedEditionsPDF

Edition structures disclose the number of prints that will be made of an image. Edition structures vary widely – some are open (without limit) and some are limited.

There are no standards for limited edition sizes. Practices change at least once a decade – sometimes more. Fifty years ago, the practice of limiting photographic editions was unheard of. Thirty years ago, the practice of limiting photographic editions became wide-spread. Twenty years ago, the most widespread edition structure contained 50. Ten years ago, a large number of editions were offered at 25. Today, many editions are restricted to 12 or fewer. Tomorrow’s edition structures will likely change again. Throughout that time, while there has been a constant trend favoring limited editions of increasingly small size, open editions have persisted and succeeded.

One should note that average photographic print prices have escalated substantially in that time, far in excess of economic inflation. This escalation isn’t uniform in the market; the low end has remained relatively unchanged, while the high end has exploded.

Should you limit your editions?

Should you buy only limited edition photographs?

Before you decide, find out more in this free PDF.

Subscribe to Insights enews and download it free.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

Why Make Prints ?

October 22, 2013 | Leave a Comment |

WhyMakePrints

This is an excerpt from my article on Digital Photo Pro.

Why Make Prints ?

Making prints does so many things for your images. How many things? Let me count the ways …

They’re …

Sensual

Prints enhance your images with material qualities and the associations they bring with them.

Sizeable

Prints define the scale of your images.

Durable

Historically, it’s the images that were printed that survived.

Salable

Because they’re physical, prints are easily bought and sold.

Exclusive

Images in print are more rare, as well as less accessible.

Presentable

Prints encourage images to be viewed in different ways.

What Making Prints Can Do For You

When you make a print, you consider your images more carefully for a longer period of time and often multiple times. This adds up. It’s quite likely that along the way you’ll find many ways to improve your images. Repeat this process many times, and you’ll find that your vision as a whole will improve.

Read more on Digital Photo Pro.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

Making prints does many things for you. To make a print you have to answer many questions. You learn a lot when you make a print. Realizing your vision in print means more than just making it real, it also means you’ll make many realizations about your vision along the way.

The new opportunities making prints presents challenge you to clarify and declare your intentions. What do you want to accomplish with your images? If your goal is to make an historic record you may be content with making a few, perhaps only one, possibly quite small, highly durable print that is stored and preserved very carefully for the future appreciation of only a few. On the other hand, if your goal is to expose the largest number of people possible to your imagery, you may want to consider creating an international billboard campaign now. How do you want people to interact with your images? Do you want to present your images as casual, everyday, highly accessible, utilitarian artifacts or scarce, highly refined, collectibles? The way you choose to print (or not to print) your images will get people to look at, interact with, share, and value them in entirely different ways. When you choose one thing you often have to let another go. If you choose many things simultaneously take steps to make the comparisons meaningful or you run the risk of creating confusing mixed messages. The things you make your images into will guide the viewer on a reenactment of your journey of discovery – and part of that journey of discovery lies in making and appreciating prints.

Printing your images also challenges you to clarify and declare your sensibilities. How do you prefer your images to look? What is the appropriate scale for an image – miniature, life-sized, or larger-than-life? Scale changes the physical and psychological reactions people have to images. They draw close to small prints and sometimes hold them or even carry them with them wherever they go; large prints immerse people in images that may fill their entire visual field until they pull back to view them from a distance. You can change a space or even create new space with prints. How will materials enhance your visual statements? Synthetic or organic? Smooth or textured? Uniform or irregular? Sharp or soft? Reflective or non-reflective? White, cream, or another colored base? All of these factors will have not just a technical impact on detail and color in your image but also on the psychological reactions their associations produce within the viewer. Inevitably, when making a print some things are gained and others are sacrificed. The sacrifices you are willing to make offer an opportunity to clarify your priorities. What do you want people to appreciate most about your images? Let this question be your guide as you first explore possibilities and later make decisions about how to present your images.

To answer the many questions making prints raises you have to pay attention to many details. When you make prints you are called to carefully consider your images and what you want to say and do with them. Prints also offer invitations for others to carefully consider not only your images but also your vision. Once you’ve made prints, you’ll not only understand your vision better, by extension you’ll understand other people’s vision better too.

Sure you can let others make prints for you. But you’ll be missing out on the opportunities they present to further clarify and resolve your vision. Even if you do it, really do it, just once, you’ll learn a lot.

Find out about my prints here.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.


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