2009 Workshops Announced


My 2009 workshop schedule is live. My field workshops emphasize creative approaches to exposure. My lab workshops emphasize creative approaches to post-processing. All of the exercises are designed to help you find and refine your unique authentic voice. There are four international destinations – Antarctica, South America, Namibia, and Iceland. There are two field workshop in Maine. All lab workshops are held in my private studio / gallery. Early registrants get 15% off. Space is limited.
Check out the full schedule here.
Check out specific workshops here.
Check out what past alumns have said about their experiences here.
See alumni work on this blog. Click the Alumni under Categories.

San Diego – Lecture Tonight & Workshop Next Two Days


Lecture – Museum of Photographic Arts
Tonight from 7-9 in San Diego at the Museum of Photographic Arts and Cuyamaca College, I lecture on my work and creative process.
Here’s an excerpt from my statement A Call To Connection. “This work is a call to incite conscientious creative interaction with our total environment. This work is a call to connection with us. If we feel that we are a part of nature, conscientious practices will no longer need to be legislated, they will simply happen. If we feel that we are not insignificant, we will act to make our own positive contributions in our own unique and creative ways.”
Read my Artist’s statements here.
See my work here.
Workshop – Julia Dean in San Diego
Friday and Saturday I’ll be teaching a workshop – The Power of Color. Space is still available.
Find out more here.
Find more Canon sponsored events here.

Dan Steinhardt – About Paper / Meaningless Terms


Last week at The Fine Art of Digital Printing workshop The Fine Art of Digital Printing workshop (taking place at Brooks sponsored by Epson) spoke about paper. We always have special guests at these events and we were delighted that Dano was able to come this time. Dano explained a lot of interesting things about paper (three types – swellable, microporous, cotton fiber)(the history and myths of OBA’s – optical brightening agents – used in paper coatings, some longer lasting than others)(longevity facts – it’s a combination of many factors, lightfastness being only one).
One of the funnier things that everyone came away with was how many terms we’re used to hearing and using that are essentially meaningless and can be potentially misleading if you make assumptions often associated with the terms. “Fine art paper”, “museum grade”, “archival”, “pearl”, “luster”, “stipple” are all marketing terms with no definite meaning. “Permanent” means water fast, but doesn’t imply light fast. “Compatibility” simply means the paper will transport through the printer – nothing more. So it pays to know which terms are truly meaningful/useful and which terms aren’t.
More to come on this. Stay tuned.
Look for upcoming Epson Print Academy dates here.
Check out The Fine Art of Digital Printing workshops here.
Check out my Fine Digital Print workshops here.

Peg Fredi – Simulating Alternative Processes / Waxing Prints


This week at The Fine Art of Digital Printing workshop (taking place at Brooks sponsored by Epson) Peg Fredi wanted to simulate the look of the alternative process prints she’s been making with digital contact negatives. She tried several toning solutions – variations of traditional warm toning solutions. She found that she like the black of the inkjet prints, which is even blacker than alternative process blacks. She tried several paper types, ultimately deciding on Epson Velvet paper, which she then planned to wax (with butcher’s wax) to enhance the surface further. Actually, waxing print surfaces has been around a long time. It adds an extra dimension and quality to any print. And it doesn’t affect longevity. It pays to experiment. You may find new solutions that are just right for your work.
Have you finished your prints in unusual ways? Tell us about it! Comment here!
See Peg Fredi’s work here.
Look for upcoming Epson Print Academy dates here.
Check out The Fine Art of Digital Printing workshops here.
Check out my Fine Digital Print workshops here.

Steve Robeck – Thinking File Structure


This week at The Fine Art of Digital Printing workshop (taking place at Brooks sponsored by Epson) Mac Holbert and I reviewed file structure at the end of the week – by processing student work. Everyone participating in the workshop got a valuable review of the file building workflow Mac and I use and recommend. Steve Robeck also got more than one possible window into the art of interpreting digital files. Time and time again, you modify how you apply a tool, eliminate it from the process, or add another. In this case we added a Photo Filter adjustment layer applied selectively to the highlights to add subtle warm ambient color and we used an additional Hue/Saturation layer to increase the saturation of yellow accent colors throughout the image. Adopting a consistent file structure and working methodology is important. And, knowing when and why to make exceptions is equally important.
Look for upcoming Epson Print Academy dates here.
Check out The Fine Art of Digital Printing workshops here.
Check out my Fine Digital Print workshops here.

Carlos Conseco – Print Surface


This week at The Fine Art of Digital Printing workshop (taking place at Brooks sponsored by Epson) Carlos Conseco discovered how important it is to test materials and evaluate images side-by-side. He printed one of his best images on a variety of surfaces – Epson Watercolor, Velvet, Ultrasmooth Fine Art, Luster, and Exhibition Fiber. They were all good. Each material added something new to the expression of his print. Materials affect print quality in technical ways (glossy papers produce blacker blacks) and aesthetic ways (matte papers seem softer and more organic). So he slept on it before making his final decision. The most important thing he learned was that materials matter.
What papers do you like? Why? Comment here!
Look for upcoming Epson Print Academy dates here.
Check out The Fine Art of Digital Printing workshops here.
Check out my Fine Digital Print workshops here.

Ken Carl – Extreme Low Light Shooting


Ken Carl has attended every one of my Fall Foliage workshops. Over the years, he’s turned pro. Just when I think he’s done, he keeps coming back for more. After a long day of shooting past sunset at Pemaquid Point, Ken walked up the streets of Damariscotta while the rest of the group was being seated for dinner – and got some great shots. After dark? Hand held? ISO 8000? Really? And it’s actually useful, with surprisingly little noise by traditional standards. You’ve got to try it to believe it. The LCD on the back of the camera actually shows you more than you can see at that moment. Add a tripod to the equation and you’ll see even more. Today’s cameras can capture more than you can see at any one moment in time. With a little experimentation, you’ll find hours of new possibilities at the beginning and ends of the day. This weekend we tested shooting in many extreme lighting situations. Participants are seeing in new ways. I’m seeing in new ways. I recommend frequently testing new techniques to expand your repetoire and your vision.
Check out Ken Carl’s work here.
Check out my workshops here.

Test Exposure Time Onsite


Sometimes the camera eye sees very differently than our eyes. So, it’s really useful to try new experiments. Getting a preview on screen (back of the camera or portable camera on location) give you immediate feedback. Then you can put that newfound knowledge to use on the spot.
Today in my Fall Foliage workshop, I tested time for everyone. The same stream had many different rates of flow so what worked in one situation wasn’t optimal in another. Here, 1/250th of a second with is compared with 30 seconds. At a waterfall upstream motion wasn’t frozen until 1/1000 of a second and 4 seconds was best for streaking as after 8 seconds the waterfall began to turn vaporous rather than streak.
Check out my workshops here.

Mary Virginia Swanson – Business of Fine Art Workshops / Seminars


Mary Virginia Swanson is simply the best in her field – educating photographers about the business of art. Her knowledge of the diverse markets available (gallery, stock, publishing, etc) to artists is exceptionally broad and deep. Most importantly, she’s a passionate advocate for artists; she cares deeply about their success.
Mary Virginia Swanson just announced a new workshop in her hometown Tucson, Arizona.
“This workshop, led by Mary Virginia Swanson, will provide participants with an overview of the fine art photography market and how one can effectively target galleries, collections and publishers most likely to respond to their work. An understanding of presenting work to industry professionals via competitions and portfolio review events, as well as the value of attending Gallery Expos will be discussed. Examples of successful promotional tools with be shared. Ms. Swanson will bring an extensive library of reference materials and examples of successful self-promotion examples to the Workshop to share with participants.”
How good is she? Alec soth said, “Taking a marketing workshop with Ms. Swanson was a life changing experience.” That’s high praise from a fast rising art star.
Find out about the workshop here.
Find out about Mary Virginia Swanson’s seminars here.
Find out about Mary Virginia Swanson here.
Check Mary Virginia Swanson’s blog often for a a wealth of useful information.
If you’ve attended an MVS event? Comment here!