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Adobe's New Innovation in Raw Technology – Camera Profiles

This new Raw technology gives photographers access to flexible camera profiles. Camera profiles provide a visual starting point for a raw processing workflow. Adobe is supplying default camera profiles that closely emulate the look that photographers are used to seeing from their favorite camera, while also providing the ability to customize profiles to an individual’s taste. Camera profiles  for use with Lightroom 2 and Camera Raw 4.5, are available for immediate download on Adobe Labs.

Lightroom 2


Lightroom 2 shipped July 29.
Key features are …
– Regional Adjustments (now you can apply adjustments selectively)
– Graduated Filters
– Output Sharpening
– 16 Bit Printing
– Suggested Keywords
– Smart Collections
– Open LR adjusted files in Photoshop as Smart Objects
And many excellent improvements to existing features.
Lightroom 2 for new users is $299. Upgrades from Lightroom 1 are $99.
Get it here.
Check out Jeff Schewe’s post at Photoshop New here.
Check out Scott Kelby’s post here.
Check out Lightroom News here.
Check out NAPP’s Learning Center here.
Check out Photoshop Cafe’s Learning Site here.
Check out Colin Smith’s Lightroom 2 DVD here.
Check out Michael Reichman and Jeff Schewe’s Guide to Lightroom 2 here.
Check out Scott Kelby’s Lightroom 2 book here.
Check out Martin Evening’s Lightroom 2 book here.

The Future of Video Projection?


Princess Leiah, can you color manage that?
Now I know I’m a geek.
A bad Star Wars joke and color management in the same line?
But, this technology stuff is very cool.
Check this out.
Video in thin air?
The Helio display is a video projector that casts images on condensed air.

I Use – Opteka HotShoe TwoAxis DoubleBubble SpiritLevel


Alright, now I have to admit it. I like toys. This little item is stylish, inexpensive, and useful.
Straight lines are important to me. While I practice refining my eye for seeing when things are level and parallel, in some situations it helps to have a level that will double check things for you.
Check out more of the gear I Use on this blog (search for Equipment), on this site, and in my AStore.
Check out my field workshops here.
Get a 20% discount on my Iceland (8/18-22) workshop here.
Get a 15% discount on my Fall Foliage (10/17-20) workshop here – until 8/17.
The first 5 Insights Members get $1000 off South America (2/2-14/09), thereafter $250.
Space just became available in my workshop in Namibia.

Gloss Differential

Gloss differential is an uneven reflectance of the surface of a print. In inkjet printing, very dark colors are produced with substantial amounts of ink while very light colors are produced with little or no ink. This can produce differences in reflectivity throughout the surface of a print in many images. While this is not an issue for most matte surfaces, it can be distracting when looking at glossy prints under specific angles of light.

Recent ink technology includes additives designed to reduce gloss differential to produce more even print surfaces. In addition, some separation routines reduce it even further. Epson printer drivers include two features in their Advanced Black and White mode, Highlight Point Shift and Highlight Tonality slider, that can be used to reduce gloss differential. Running these settings to a maximum virtually eliminates gloss differential. Because clear and very light black ink are used in these delicate areas, this darkens the print only slightly. You can compensate for this by lightening the file before printing.

How can you identify gloss differential? Make a print with very bright highlight areas. Look at those printed areas under bright light while varying the angle of the surface of the print and compare the reflectance you see there to darker surrounding areas.

What can you do to reduce gloss differential? Use the latest inksets. Optionally, use the most recent black and white software routines to reduce it even further. Finally, consider spraying, varnishing, or waxing the surface of your prints.

Read more with my online Printing Resources.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

Bronzing

Bronzing is an iridescent flash of color, typically bronze, produced when viewing prints under varying angles of light. It’s produced by pigmented ink’s tendency to refract light. It’s most visible in black and white prints but affects color prints as well. It affects glossy surfaces almost exclusively.    

Optimum choice of ink and precise placement makes the difference. Recently, new separation routines and screening algorithms have been devised to place droplets of specific ink colors, in specific patterns, in combination with other inks to dramatically reduce bronzing.

How can you identify bronzing? Look at the surface of a glossy print in near direct light. Change the angle of the print and look for a flash of bronze near areas of glare.

What can you do to eliminate bronzing? Choose the best inksets and drivers. (Optionally, print on a matte surface.) This will all but eliminate bronzing in your prints.

Read more with my online Printing Resources.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.

I Use – Giotto's Rocket Air Blaster


It’s a first line of defense. Before you touch your sensor, see if you can blow the dust off. Don’t blow with your mouth. Spit happens. Don’t blow with canned air. Spit still happens. Try a manual blower like this one.
Check out more of the gear I Use on this blog (search for Equipment), on this site, and in my AStore.
Check out my field workshops here.
Get a 20% discount on my Iceland (8/18-22) workshop here – expires 8/10.
Get a 15% discount on my Fall Foliage (10/17-20) workshop here – until 8/17.
The first 5 Insights Members get $1000 off South America (2/2-14/09), thereafter $250.
Space just became available in my workshop in Namibia.

Metamerism

3500 K

5000 K

6500 K

Metameric failure is the tendency of an object to change its appearance under different light sources. Different light sources, even of the same color temperature, are often comprised of differing amounts of spectral frequencies (i.e. red or blue frequencies). Some objects change appearance more quickly than others; they are more highly metameric. This is true when comparing dye-based inks with pigmented inks. As pigments are made of irregular particles, they tend to refract (reflect and bend) light more strongly than uniform dye globules. The most current ink technology coats pigment particles in resin to reduce this effect. Additionally, some color pigments, typically the most saturated ones, are more prone to metamerism. By separating the file differently and using more of the less metameric ink to reproduce an image, the print’s appearance stability is increased. This is particularly important when reproducing neutrals, as small shifts in hue are quickly detected in these colors.

How can you evaluate metameric failure? Make two prints of the same image (preferably containing significant neutrals) and compare them side by side in different light sources.

What can you do to reduce metameric failure? Use the latest inksets and drivers (with the latest separation routines). And, when practical, standardize the light your prints are viewed under. Can metamerism be completely eliminated? No. Everything is metameric. But metameric failure in prints can be reduced to the point where it is no longer significant or noticeable.

With new technologies come new possibilities and new challenges. Recent advances in inkjet technology (ink formulation, separation routines, and screening algorithms) are making noticeable gloss differential, bronzing, and metameric failure things of the past. It pays to stay informed of the latest developments in printing technology. Your prints will simply get better.

Read more with my online Printing Resources.

Learn more in my digital photography and digital printing workshops.