New Epson Legacy Papers

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“Legacy Papers marry the artistry of revered European paper making with the latest advancements in inkjet coating technology.
Working with the finest paper mills in Germany and France we first specify the type of base required for each of the Legacy papers. Once the base is produced, advanced microporus coatings are applied using modern techniques for the highest quality and consistency.
Only after meeting hundreds of design specifications, while ensuring for a high rate of production consistency for the richest blacks, outstanding color fidelity and smooth tonal transitions, will a paper carry the Epson Legacy name.”
The First Four Epson Legacy Papers

  • Legacy Platine: 100 percent cotton fibre paper with a bright OBA-free, smooth satin finish. With a unique feel of an artistic paper of centuries past, along with an outstanding color gamut, this paper is exceptional for both color and black and white printmaking.
  • Legacy Fibre: 100 percent cotton fibre paper with an exceptionally bright OBA-free, smooth matte finish. With an outstanding black density, this paper is ideal for all types of high-end printmaking.
  • Legacy Baryta: A baryta paper with a white, smooth satin finish, utilizing two barium sulfate coatings. Inspired by the F64 group, this paper takes the best of revered silver halide technology to new levels of quality.
  • Legacy Etching: 100 percent cotton fibre paper with a bright OBA-free, uniquely textured matte finish beloved by artists for centuries. This paper has the feel of traditional etching papers.

Find out more here.

“The combination of Epson Legacy Paper and Epson UltraChrome® HD and HDX pigment ink technology can provide up to twice the Display Permanence Ratings of previous generation inks, according to tests conducted by the Wilhelm Imaging Research, Inc.”

Find out more here.

Save 10% On Moab Papers


Get 10% off all Moab products with this discount code – JPMOAB2011.
Moab is one of the most trusted paper producers in the industry offering a full line of substrates that spans the gamut from canvas, to washi, to metallics.
For something different, explore their Moenkopie Washi (Asian rice papers) or their new Slickrock Metallic Pearl (pearlscent).
Get more discounts here.
Find out more about the tools I use here.
Learn more in my digital photography and digital printmaking workshops here

Epson Signature Worthy Papers

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“Only the highest quality Epson papers receive the designation of Signature Worthy. Watch the introduction and view the complete interviews to see why these industry leaders choose Epson Signature Worthy Papers.”
Lois Greenfield, David Lynch, Matthew Jordan Smith, Vincent Versace, Art Wolfe tell you what they like best about Epson papers.
Learn more about digital printing with my online Lessons.
Learn still more in my DVD Fine Art Digital Printing.
Learn even more in my Fine Art Digital Printing Workshops.

Dan Steinhardt – About Paper / Meaningless Terms


Last week at The Fine Art of Digital Printing workshop The Fine Art of Digital Printing workshop (taking place at Brooks sponsored by Epson) spoke about paper. We always have special guests at these events and we were delighted that Dano was able to come this time. Dano explained a lot of interesting things about paper (three types – swellable, microporous, cotton fiber)(the history and myths of OBA’s – optical brightening agents – used in paper coatings, some longer lasting than others)(longevity facts – it’s a combination of many factors, lightfastness being only one).
One of the funnier things that everyone came away with was how many terms we’re used to hearing and using that are essentially meaningless and can be potentially misleading if you make assumptions often associated with the terms. “Fine art paper”, “museum grade”, “archival”, “pearl”, “luster”, “stipple” are all marketing terms with no definite meaning. “Permanent” means water fast, but doesn’t imply light fast. “Compatibility” simply means the paper will transport through the printer – nothing more. So it pays to know which terms are truly meaningful/useful and which terms aren’t.
More to come on this. Stay tuned.
Look for upcoming Epson Print Academy dates here.
Check out The Fine Art of Digital Printing workshops here.
Check out my Fine Digital Print workshops here.

Peg Fredi – Simulating Alternative Processes / Waxing Prints


This week at The Fine Art of Digital Printing workshop (taking place at Brooks sponsored by Epson) Peg Fredi wanted to simulate the look of the alternative process prints she’s been making with digital contact negatives. She tried several toning solutions – variations of traditional warm toning solutions. She found that she like the black of the inkjet prints, which is even blacker than alternative process blacks. She tried several paper types, ultimately deciding on Epson Velvet paper, which she then planned to wax (with butcher’s wax) to enhance the surface further. Actually, waxing print surfaces has been around a long time. It adds an extra dimension and quality to any print. And it doesn’t affect longevity. It pays to experiment. You may find new solutions that are just right for your work.
Have you finished your prints in unusual ways? Tell us about it! Comment here!
See Peg Fredi’s work here.
Look for upcoming Epson Print Academy dates here.
Check out The Fine Art of Digital Printing workshops here.
Check out my Fine Digital Print workshops here.

Carlos Conseco – Print Surface


This week at The Fine Art of Digital Printing workshop (taking place at Brooks sponsored by Epson) Carlos Conseco discovered how important it is to test materials and evaluate images side-by-side. He printed one of his best images on a variety of surfaces – Epson Watercolor, Velvet, Ultrasmooth Fine Art, Luster, and Exhibition Fiber. They were all good. Each material added something new to the expression of his print. Materials affect print quality in technical ways (glossy papers produce blacker blacks) and aesthetic ways (matte papers seem softer and more organic). So he slept on it before making his final decision. The most important thing he learned was that materials matter.
What papers do you like? Why? Comment here!
Look for upcoming Epson Print Academy dates here.
Check out The Fine Art of Digital Printing workshops here.
Check out my Fine Digital Print workshops here.

Printing – Finding the Coated Side of the Paper


Finding the side of a paper that’s optimized for printing can sometimes be challenging. Here are a few tips to help.
1 Look for the logo – the logo is always on the back.
2 Compare whites – the coated side is often whiter.
3 Feel the surface – the coated side is smoother.
4 Lick the paper – the coated side sticks more.
5 Feel the edge – paper is cut coated side up leaving a tiny lip/edge on the back side.
If you have other tips for finding the coated side of paper, comment here!
Learn this and other tips and techniques in my Fine Digital Print workshops series.